QUT ePrints

The prostitute and the client : challenging the dualisms

Carpenter, Belinda J. (1998) The prostitute and the client : challenging the dualisms. Women's Studies International Forum, 21(4), pp. 387-399.

View at publisher

Abstract

Certain ways of knowing the prostitute and the client predominate. He is understood through the discourse of sexology, she is understood through the discourses of psychology, psychoanalysis, economics and feminism. However, while the prostitute and the client appear to be known through unrelated and diverse discourses, such ways of knowing are organised through the dualisms of sex and gender, victim and agent, mind and body. Moreover, these ways of knowing are directly related to popular discourse, policy and legislation on the topic. This paper examines the relationship between ways of knowing the prostitute and the client, and political action in Australia. it argues that inadequate theoretical conceptualisations are often at the heart of poorly conceived praxis - in this case Australian policy and legislation. This paper will demonstrate that re-thinking the theory can lead to new ways of acting.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
2 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 29018
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: prostitute, client, prostitution, selling sex, buying sex
DOI: 10.1016/S0277-5395(98)00041-7
ISSN: 0277-5395
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Social Theory (160806)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Schools > School of Justice
Deposited On: 04 Dec 2009 09:35
Last Modified: 22 Apr 2010 01:58

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page