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Challenging endoscopy reprocessing guidelines: a prospective study investigating the safe shelf life of flexible endoscopes in a tertiary gastroenterology unit.

Osborne, Sonya, Reynolds, Stewart , Lindenmayer, Fiona , Gill, Anne , Chalmers, Margaret , & George, Narelle (2007) Challenging endoscopy reprocessing guidelines: a prospective study investigating the safe shelf life of flexible endoscopes in a tertiary gastroenterology unit. Endoscopy, 39(9), pp. 825-830.

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Abstract

Professional prac− tice guidelines for endoscope reprocessing re− commend reprocessing endoscopes between each case and proper storage following repro− cessing after the last case of the list. There is lim− ited empirical evidence to support the efficacy of endoscope reprocessing prior to use in the first case of the day; however, internationally, many guidelines continue to recommend this practice. The aim of this study is to estimate a safe shelf life for flexible endoscopes in a high−turnover gastroenterology unit. Materials and methods: In a prospective obser− vational study, all flexible endoscopes in active service during the 3−week study period were mi− crobiologically sampled prior to reprocessing be− fore the first case of the day (n = 200). The main outcome variables were culture status, organism cultured, and shelf life. Results: Among the total number of useable samples (n = 194), the overall contamination rate was 15.5 %, with a pathogenic contamination rate of 0.5 %. Mean time between last case one day and reprocessing before the first case on the next day (that is, shelf life) was 37.62 h (SD 36.47). Median shelf life was 18.8 h (range 5.27± 165.35 h). The most frequently identified organ− ism was coagulase−negative Staphylococcus, an environmental nonpathogenic organism. Conclusions: When processed according to es− tablished guidelines, flexible endoscopes remain free from pathogenic organisms between last case and next day first case use. Significant re− ductions in the expenditure of time and resources on reprocessing endoscopes have the potential to reduce the restraints experienced by high−turnover endoscopy units and improve ser− vice delivery.

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8 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 29414
Item Type: Journal Article
ISSN: 0013-726X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000) > Nursing not elsewhere classified (111099)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Copyright Owner: Georg Thieme Verlag
Deposited On: 08 Jun 2010 16:08
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:37

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