QUT ePrints

Rethinking the notion of culture in the national history curriculum

Henderson, Deborah J. (2009) Rethinking the notion of culture in the national history curriculum. The Social Educator, 27(3 ), pp. 4-11.

[img] Pending Publisher's Permission (PDF 694kB)
Published Version.
Administrators only | Request a copy from author

View at publisher

Abstract

Major global changes are placing new demands on the Australian education system. Recent statements by the Prime Minister, together with current education policy and national curriculum documents available in the public domain, look to education’s role in promoting economic prosperity and social cohesion. Collectively, they emphasise the need to equip young Australians with the knowledge, understandings and skills required to compete in the global economy and participate as engaged citizens in a culturally diverse world. However, the decision to prioritise discipline-based learning in the forthcoming Australian history curriculum without specifically encompassing culture as a referent, raises the following question. How will students acquire the cultural knowledge, understandings and skills necessary for this process? This paper addresses this question by situating the current push for a national history curriculum, with specific reference to the study of Indigenous history and the study of Asia in Australia.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 29415
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: national history curriculum, culture and identity, cultural competence, Asia literacy, Indigneous perspectives
ISSN: 1328-3480
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > CURRICULUM AND PEDAGOGY (130200) > Humanities and Social Sciences Curriculum and Pedagogy (excl. Economics Business and Management) (130205)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (210000) > HISTORICAL STUDIES (210300) > Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History (210301)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (210000) > HISTORICAL STUDIES (210300) > Australian History (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History) (210303)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY (210000) > HISTORICAL STUDIES (210300) > Asian History (210302)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Office of Education Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Past > Schools > School of Cultural & Language Studies in Education
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 Social Educators Association of Australia
Copyright Statement: Contributions to The Social Educator become the property of SEAA unless otherwise negotiated by the author. While reasonable checks have been made to ensure the accuracy of statements and advice, no responsibility can be accepted for errors and omissions however caused. No responsibility for any loss occasioned to any person acting on or refraining from action as a result of material in this publication is accepted by authors, SEAA or the Editorial Board. The Editors reserve the right to edit articles at their own discretion unless otherwise requested. Please note that the opinions expressed by the contributors to this journal are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of SEAA or the Editorial Board.
Deposited On: 22 Dec 2009 15:07
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:03

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page