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Socio-cultural dimensions of Active Futures : Importance of studying migrants’ perspectives of wellness

Sharma-Brymer, Vinathe & Brymer, Eric (2009) Socio-cultural dimensions of Active Futures : Importance of studying migrants’ perspectives of wellness. In Creating Active Futuers : Edited Proceedings of the 26th ACHPER International Conference, School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059, Australia., Brisbane, Australia, pp. 333-344.

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Abstract

In this paper we provide a migrant perspective on how women and men from a different culture perceive wellness while settling down in a new country. We are discussing the texts of research interviews with Indian migrant women and men that illuminate their perception of lifestyle enhancement in their adopted country Australia. Our purpose is to show how socio-cultural factors influence the migrants‟ perspective of lifestyle enhancement, and to what extent they direct their wellness. Personal development, both in theory and practice, is a huge concept in Australia. Concerted efforts are made towards increasing public awareness about health literacy leading to a better understanding and practice of wellness. However, as research studies have pointed out, lifestyle enhancement leading to holistic wellness is not void of socio-cultural factors. The number of women and men migrating to Australia from India has increased greatly in the present decade. As migrants their participation in developing Australian society is significant. So what is their socio-cultural perception of wellness including nutrition and physical exercises as active citizens? How do young Indian migrants participate in lifestyle enhancement programmes? As parents what are their socio-cultural beliefs, attitudes, practices and values, and how do they influence their children‟s participation in personal development and PE progammes? To what extent gender differences exist in such participation levels? What is the space available in State school curriculum to learn from the migrants‟ cultures towards enhancing lifestyles including nutrition and personal development?The findings may sensitise Australian researchers, academics, school teachers and practitioners of wellness therapies. Long term research studies may inform the governments and HPE practitioners of the changes occurring in such values, beliefs and practices as they incorporate nutrition and lifestyles of Australian society.

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ID Code: 29699
Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: The papers published in this document have been carefully peer reviewed by independent and qualified experts. The Editors wish to make it clear that whilst the strict peer review process has been applied to all published papers, due to the multi-disciplinary and International nature of the conference the editors have accepted a variety of International styles such as reference structure and spellings. Author acknowledgements are based on the information provided at the time of submission.
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Migrants, Health, Wellness, Socio-Cultural
ISBN: 978-1-74107-286-0
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health and Community Services (111708)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified (110699)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 School of Human Movement Studies, Queensland University of Technology and individual authors. Copyright in each of the papers printed herein is retained by the respective authors.
Copyright Statement: This work is copyright. Apart from any use permitted under the Copyright Act 1968, no part may be reproduced by any process without written permission from the copyright holders.
Deposited On: 19 Jan 2010 10:59
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:03

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