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Queering cyberspace : fan fiction communities as spaces for expressing and exploring sexuality

Hayes, Sharon L. & Ball, Matthew J. (2010) Queering cyberspace : fan fiction communities as spaces for expressing and exploring sexuality. In Scherer, Burkhard (Ed.) Queering Paradigms. Peter Lang AG, Bern, pp. 219-239.

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      Abstract

      The social construction of sexuality over the past one hundred and fifty years has created a dichotomy between heterosexual and non-heterosexual identities that essentially positions the former as “normal” and the latter as deviant. Even Kinsey’s and others’ work on the continuum of sexualities did little to alter the predominantly heterosexist perception of the non-heterosexual as “other” (Kinsey, Pomeroy and Martin 2007; Esterberg 2006; Franceour and Noonan 2007). Some political action and academic work is beginning to challenge such perceptions. Even some avenues of social interaction, such as the recent proliferation of online communities, may also challenge such views, or at least contribute to their being rethought in some ways. This chapter explores a specific kind of online community devoted to fan fiction, specifically homoerotic – or what is known colloquially as “slash” – fan fiction. Fan fiction is fiction, published on the internet, and written by fans of well-known books and television shows, using the characters to create new and varied plots. “Slash” refers to the pairing of two of the male characters in a romantic relationship, and the term comes from the punctuation mark dividing the named pair as, for example, Spock/Kirk from the Star Trek television series. Although there are some slash fan-fiction stories devoted to female-female relationships – called “femmeslash” – the term “slash” generally refers to male-male relationships, and will be utilized throughout this chapter, given that the research discussed focuses on communities centered around one such male pairing.

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      ID Code: 29777
      Item Type: Book Chapter
      Keywords: sexuality, cyberspace, fan fiction, gender performance
      ISBN: 9783039119707
      Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > CULTURAL STUDIES (200200) > Culture Gender Sexuality (200205)
      Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Sociology not elsewhere classified (160899)
      Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900) > Gender Specific Studies (169901)
      Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES (220000) > PHILOSOPHY (220300) > Poststructuralism (220317)
      Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
      Current > Schools > School of Justice
      Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Please consult the authors.
      Deposited On: 20 Jan 2010 13:03
      Last Modified: 05 Mar 2012 01:35

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