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Obesity in pregnancy : outcomes and economics

Rowlands, Ingrid, Graves, Nicholas, de Jersey, Susan Jane, McIntyre, H. David, & Callaway, Leonie (2010) Obesity in pregnancy : outcomes and economics. Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, 15(2), pp. 94-99.

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Abstract

Maternal obesity is an important aspect of reproductive care. It is the commonest risk factor for maternal mortality in developed countries and is also associated with a wide spectrum of adverse pregnancy outcomes. Maternal obesity may have longer-term implications for the health of the mother and infant, which in turn will have economic implications. Efforts to prevent, manage and treat obesity in pregnancy will be costly, but may pay dividends from reduced future economic costs, and subsequent improvements to maternal and infant health. Decision-makers working in this area of health services should understand whether the problem can be reduced, at what cost; and then, what cost savings and health benefits will accrue in the future from a reduction of the problem.

Impact and interest:

19 citations in Scopus
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12 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 29948
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Costs, Maternal, Pregnancy, Obesity
DOI: 10.1016/j.siny.2009.09.003
ISSN: 1744-165X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > APPLIED ECONOMICS (140200) > Health Economics (140208)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE (111400) > Obstetrics and Gynaecology (111402)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 Elsevier
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Seminars in Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, [VOL 15, ISSUE 2, (2010)] DOI: 10.1016/j.siny.2009.09.003
Deposited On: 28 Jan 2010 12:26
Last Modified: 07 Nov 2014 09:09

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