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Is the new age phenomenon connected to delusion-like experiences? Analysis of survey data from Australia

Aird, Rosemary, Scott, James, McGrath, John J., Najman, Jackob M., & Mamun, Abdullah A. (2010) Is the new age phenomenon connected to delusion-like experiences? Analysis of survey data from Australia. Mental Health, Religion and Culture, 13(1), pp. 37-53.

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Abstract

Recent studies have shown that delusion-like experiences (DLEs) are common among general populations. This study investigates whether the prevalence of these experiences are linked to the embracing of New Age thought. Logistic regression analyses were performed using data derived from a large community sample of young adults (N = 3777). Belief in a spiritual or higher power other than God was found to be significantly associated with endorsement of 16 of 19 items from Peters et al. (1999b) Delusional Inventory following adjustment for a range of potential confounders, while belief in God was associated with endorsement of four items. A New Age conception of the divine appears to be strongly associated with a wide range of DLEs. Further research is needed to determine a causal link between New Age philosophy and DLEs (e.g. thought disturbance, suspiciousness, and delusions of grandeur).

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ID Code: 29961
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: New Age, Spiritual Beliefs, Religious Beliefs, Delusion-Like Experiences, Delusional Ideation
DOI: 10.1080/13674670903131843
ISSN: 1367-4676
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Psychiatry (incl. Psychotherapy) (110319)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Deposited On: 22 Feb 2010 07:22
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:04

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