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The planning of airport regions and National Aviation Policy Issues and challenges in the Australian experience 2008-2009

Freestone, Robert & Baker, Douglas Charles (2009) The planning of airport regions and National Aviation Policy Issues and challenges in the Australian experience 2008-2009. In Knippenberger, U & Wall, A (Eds.) Airports in Cities and Regions: Regions and Practise ; 1st International Colloquium on Airports and Spatial Development, KIT Scientific Publishing, University of Karlsruhe, Baden-Württemberg, pp. 69-83.

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    Abstract

    The planning of airports has long been contentious because of their localisation of negative impacts. The globalisation, commercialisation and deregulation of the aviation industry has unleashed powerful new economic forces both on and offairport. Over the last two decades, many airports have evolved into airport cities located at the heart of the wider aerotropolis region. This shifts the appropriate scale of planning analysis towards broader regional concerns. However,governments have been slow to respond and airport planning usually remains poorly integrated with local, city and regional planning imperatives. The Australian experience exemplifies the divide. The privatization of major Australian airports from 1996 has seen billions of dollars spent on new airside and landside infrastructure but with little oversight from local and state authorities because the ultimate authority for on-airport development is the Federal Minister for Transport. Consequently, there have been growing tensions in many major airport regions between the private airport lessee and the broader community, exacerbated by both the building of highly conspicuous non-aeronautical developments and growing airport area congestion. This paper examines the urban planning content of Australia’s national aviation policy review (2008-09) with reference to current and potential opportunities for all-of-region collaboration in the planning process.

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    ID Code: 31464
    Item Type: Conference Paper
    Keywords: Land use planning, Infrastructure, South East Queensland
    ISBN: 978-3-86644-506-2
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > OTHER BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (129900)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (120500)
    Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
    Past > Schools > School of Urban Development
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2009 Please consult the authors.
    Deposited On: 13 Sep 2010 12:43
    Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:22

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