QUT ePrints

Lifting the lifegiving dollar : case samples of creative practice in health and medical research philanthropy

Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies (2005) Lifting the lifegiving dollar : case samples of creative practice in health and medical research philanthropy. Research Australia, Sydney.

View at publisher

Abstract

This study aims to stimulate thought, debate and action for change on this question of more vigorous philanthropic funding of Australian health and medical research (HMR). It sharpens the argument with some facts and ideas about HMR funding from overseas sources. It also reports informed opinions from those working, giving and innovating in this area. It pinpoints the range of attitudes to HMR giving, both positive and negative. The study includes some aspects of Government funding as part of the equation, viewing Government as major HMR givers, with particular ability to partner, leverage and create incentives. Stimulating new philanthropy takes active outreach. The opportunity to build more dialogue between the HMR industry and the wider community is timely given the ‘licence to practice’ issues and questioned trust that applies currently somewhat both to science and to the charitable sector. This interest in improving HMR philanthropy also coincides with the launch last year by the Federal Government of Nonprofit Australia Limited (NAL), a group currently assessing infrastructure improvements to the charitable sector. History suggests no one will create this change if Research Australia does not. However, interest in change exists in various quarters. For Research Australia to successfully change the culture of Australian HMR giving, the process will drive the outcomes. Obviously stakeholder buy-in and partners will be needed and the ultimate blueprint for greater philanthropic HMR funding here will not be this document. Instead it will be the one that wears the handprint and ‘mindprint’ of the many architects and implementers interested in promoting HMR philanthropy, from philanthropists to nonprofit peaks to government policy arms. As the African proverb says, ‘If you want to go fast, go alone; but if you want to go far, go with others’.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

570 since deposited on 03 Jun 2010
296 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 32492
Item Type: Report
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Medical Research , Philanthropy
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > OTHER STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (169900)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > OTHER MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (119900)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Australian Centre for Philanthropy and Nonprofit Studies
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2005 Research Australia Limited
Copyright Statement: This work including without limitation all information, text, names and logos is protected by copyright. This work may be used for your own personal use, information, research or study, or in a public forum solely for the promotion of health and medical research and philanthropy for health research, so long as the work is attributed to Research Australia and used in a strictly not-for-profit capacity. Reproduction by bona fide newspapers, journals and similar publications is also permitted by Research Australia subject to attribution of Research Australia in any reproduction. Neither this work (nor any part of it) may be reproduced, stored, on-sold, redistributed or otherwise used for profit.
Deposited On: 03 Jun 2010 14:54
Last Modified: 10 Jun 2010 00:30

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page