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Building climate change resilience and adaptive capacity in Australia’s community sector using social media and technology innovation

Foth, Marcus & Mallon, Karl (2010) Building climate change resilience and adaptive capacity in Australia’s community sector using social media and technology innovation. In Climate Adaptation Futures Conference (NCCARF 2010), 29 June - 1 July 2010, Gold Coast, Queensland.

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    Abstract

    Public and private sector organisations worldwide are putting strategies in place to manage the commercial and operational risks of climate change. However, community organisations are lagging behind in their understanding and preparedness, despite them being among the most exposed to the effects of climate change impacts and regulation. This poster presents a proposal for a multidisciplinary study that addresses this issue by developing, testing and applying a novel climate risk assessment methodology that is tailored to the needs of Australia’s community sector and its clients. Strategies to mitigate risks and build resilience and adaptive capacity will be identified including new opportunities afforded by urban informatics, social media, and technologies of scale making.

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    107 since deposited on 01 Jul 2010
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    ID Code: 32997
    Item Type: Conference Item (Poster)
    Keywords: Climate Change, Climate Change Adaptation, Social Media, Urban Informatics, Risk Assessment
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EARTH SCIENCES (040000) > ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES (040100) > Climate Change Processes (040104)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES (050000) > ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS (050100) > Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (050101)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > LIBRARY AND INFORMATION STUDIES (080700) > Social and Community Informatics (080709)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > URBAN AND REGIONAL PLANNING (120500) > Community Planning (120501)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > COMMERCE MANAGEMENT TOURISM AND SERVICES (150000) > BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT (150300) > Business and Management not elsewhere classified (150399)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > SOCIOLOGY (160800) > Urban Sociology and Community Studies (160810)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
    Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
    Past > Institutes > Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Marcus Foth and Karl Mallon
    Deposited On: 02 Jul 2010 08:51
    Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 01:53

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