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The relationship between culture, attitude, social networks and quality of life in midlife Australian and Taiwanese citizens

Fu, Shiu Yun, Anderson, Debra J., Courtney, Mary D., & Hu, Wenbiao (2007) The relationship between culture, attitude, social networks and quality of life in midlife Australian and Taiwanese citizens. Maturitas, 58(3), pp. 285-295.

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Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this study were to specifically investigate the differences in culture, attitudes and social networks between Australian and Taiwanese men and women and identify the factors that predict midlife men and women’s quality of life in both countries. Methods: A stratified random sample strategy based on probability proportional sampling (PPS) was conducted to investigate 278 Australian and 398 Taiwanese midlife men and women’s quality of life. Multiple regression modelling and classification and regression trees (CARTs) were performed to examine the potential differences on culture, attitude, social networks, social demographic factors and religion/spirituality in midlife men and women’s quality of life in both Australia and Taiwan. Results: The results of this study suggest that culture involves multiple functions and interacts with attitudes, social networks and individual factors to influence a person’s quality of life. Significant relationships were found between the interaction between cultural circumstances and a person’s internal and external factors. The research found that good social support networks and a healthy optimistic disposition may significantly enhance midlife men and women’s quality of life. Conclusion: The study indicated that there is a significant relationship between culture, attitude, social networks and quality of life in midlife Australian and Taiwanese men and women. People who had higher levels of horizontal individualism and collectivism, positive attitudes and better social support had better psychological, social, physical and environmental health, while it emerged that vertical individualists with competitive characteristics would experience a lower quality of life. This study has highlighted areas where opportunities exist to further reflect upon contemporary social health policies for Australian and Taiwanese societies and also within the global perspective, in order to provide enhanced quality care for growing midlife populations.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Scopus
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1 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 33639
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Culture, Attitude, Social networks, Midlife men and women’s quality of life;, Probability proportional sampling (PPS), Classification and regression trees (CARTs)
DOI: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2007.08.017
ISSN: 0378-5122
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 30 Jul 2010 12:01
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:38

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