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Do clients with acquired brain injury use the splints prescribed by occupational therapists? A descriptive study

Kuipers, K., Rassafiani, M., Ashburner, J., Griffin, J., Worley, L., Moes, L., Fleming, J., & Copley, J. (2009) Do clients with acquired brain injury use the splints prescribed by occupational therapists? A descriptive study. NeuroRehabilitation, 24(4), pp. 365-375.

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Abstract

Clients with acquired brain injury often demonstrate hypertonicity and decreased function in their upper limbs, requiring appropriate intervention. Splinting is one of the intervention methods that is widely used to address these issues. Literature shows that some clients are not using splints following fabrication. However, there is a paucity of research about the factors that influence clients to use or not use splints. This study aims to investigate these influential factors for clients with upper limb hypertonicity. Two survey tools including therapist and client questionnaires were developed and completed by both therapists and clients. Six therapists and 14 clients participated in this study and completed the relevant questionnaires. The results illustrate that most clients (13 out of 14) were continuing to use their splints four weeks following discharge from hospital. The main goals of choosing splints for both therapists and clients were prevention of contracture and deformity. The most indicated client reasons for adhering to the splint wearing program were therapist-related factors including clients’ trust and reliance on their therapists. Further reasons for clients implementing the recommended splint-wearing program and clinical implications are discussed.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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1 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 34183
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Clinical (adult physical), acquired brain injury, splint
DOI: 10.3233/NRE-2009-0491
ISSN: 1053-8135
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) (110321)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Office of Education Research
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Education
Current > Schools > School of Early Childhood
Deposited On: 23 Aug 2010 12:11
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2011 04:26

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