QUT ePrints

The regulation of food intake in humans

Finlayson, Graham , Halford, Jason C. G. , King, Neil A., & Blundell, John E. (2007) The regulation of food intake in humans. In Weickert, Martin O. (Ed.) Obesitext - The Source. Endotext.com, South Dartmouth, MA.

[img] Accepted Version (PDF 223kB)
Administrators only | Request a copy from author

    View at publisher (open access)

    Abstract

    Knowledge of the regulation of food intake is crucial to an understanding of body weight and obesity. Strictly speaking, we should refer to the control of food intake whose expression is modulated in the interests of the regulation of body weight. Food intake is controlled, body weight is regulated. However, this semantic distinction only serves to emphasize the importance of food intake. Traditionally food intake has been researched within the homeostatic approach to physiological systems pioneered by Claude Bernard, Walter Cannon and others; and because feeding is a form of behaviour, it forms part of what Curt Richter referred to as the behavioural regulation of body weight (or behavioural homeostasis). This approach views food intake as the vehicle for energy supply whose expression is modulated by a metabolic drive generated in response to a requirement for energy. The idea was that eating behaviour is stimulated and inhibited by internal signalling systems (for the drive and suppression of eating respectively) in order to regulate the internal environment (energy stores, tissue needs).

    Impact and interest:

    Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

    These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

    Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

    ID Code: 34374
    Item Type: Book Chapter
    Additional Information: INTRODUCTION 2 FOOD INTAKE AND APPETITE CONTROL 3 CONCEPTUALISATION OF THE SYSTEM CONTROLLING FOOD INTAKE BEHAVIOUR 3 EPISODIC AND TONIC SIGNALS FOR APPETITE CONTROL 4 SATIETY SIGNALS AND THE SATIETY CASCADE. 5 CHOLECYSTOKININ (CCK) 6 GLUCAGON-LIKE-PEPTIDE (GLP)-1 7 PEPTIDE YY3-36 (PYY) 8 AMYLIN 9 SATIETY CASCADE PEPTIDES 10 TONIC SIGNALS FOR APPETITE CONTROL 10 ROLE OF LEPTIN 10 GHRELIN AND HUNGER DRIVE 12 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND REGULATION OF FOOD INTAKE 13 DOES PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AFFECT APPETITE SENSITIVITY? 14 INDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY 15 PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND ENERGY BALANCE 16 HOMEOSTATIC AND HEDONIC PROCESSES OF APPETITE CONTROL 16 HOMEOSTASIS AND HEDONICS: CROSS-TALK AND INTERACTION 17 LIKING VS. WANTING FOOD 18 CONCLUSION 20 REFERENCES 21
    Additional URLs:
    Keywords: Food Intake, Humans, Regulation, Obesity
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100)
    Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
    Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
    Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 MDText.com,Inc.
    Deposited On: 06 Sep 2010 16:26
    Last Modified: 18 Sep 2013 20:18

    Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

    Repository Staff Only: item control page