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Ecology and bioprospecting

Beattie, Andrew J. , Hay, Mark , Magnusson, Bill , de Nys, Rocky , Smeathers, James E., & Vincent, Julian F.V. (2011) Ecology and bioprospecting. Austral Ecology, 36(3), pp. 341-356.

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Abstract

Bioprospecting is the exploration of biodiversity for new resources of social and commercial value. It is carried out by a wide range of established industries such as pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and agriculture as well as a wide range of comparatively new ones such as aquaculture, bioremediation, biomining, biomimetic engineering and nanotechnology. The benefits of bioprospecting have emerged from such a wide range of organisms and environments worldwide that it is not possible to predict what species or habitats will be critical to society, or industry, in the future. The benefits include an unexpected variety of products that include chemicals, genes, metabolic pathways, structures, materials and behaviours. These may provide physical blueprints or inspiration for new designs. Criticism aimed at bioprospecting has been addressed, in part, by international treaties and legal agreements aimed at stopping biopiracy and many activities are now funded by agencies that require capacity-building and economic benefits in host countries. Thus, much contemporary bioprospecting has multiple goals, including the conservation of biodiversity, the sustainable management of natural resources and economic development. Ecologists are involved in three vital ways: first, applying ecological principles to the discovery of new resources. In this context, natural history becomes a vast economic database. Second, carrying out field studies, most of them demographic, to help regulate the harvest of wild species. Third, emphasizing the profound importance of millions of mostly microscopic species to the global economy.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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2 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 34379
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: biomimicry, bioprospecting, ecology, intellectual property, pharmaceuticals
DOI: 10.1111/j.1442-9993.2010.02170.x
ISSN: 1442-9993
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > PLANT BIOLOGY (060700) > Plant Biology not elsewhere classified (060799)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ZOOLOGY (060800) > Animal Structure and Function (060807)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation Copyright 2010 Ecological Society of Australia
Deposited On: 08 Sep 2010 10:04
Last Modified: 23 Oct 2013 12:48

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