Regulating for environmental protection : a case study of the CJC inquiry into the improper disposal of liquid waste in South-East Queensland

Maddin, Hayley Patrice Florence (1996) Regulating for environmental protection : a case study of the CJC inquiry into the improper disposal of liquid waste in South-East Queensland. Masters by Research thesis, Queensland University of Technology.

Available via Document Delivery only – contact your library to place a request
If you are the author of this thesis, please contact eprints@qut.edu.au

Abstract

Queensland's political history has been built upon a culture of developmentalism, particularly at the cost of environmental protection. This has been a prominent feature in the policies of past Queensland Premiers such as T.J. Ryan, Ted Theodore, William McCormack, Forgan Smith, Frank Nicklin, Johannes Bjelke-Petersen and Wayne Goss. The policies pursued by many of these Premiers often resulted in the destruction of many sensitive environmental areas, of which the effects are still evident today. This study examines how anti-environmentalism has been a recurrent theme in state politics, as well as examining the extent to which industry has influenced governmental policies toward developmentalism. In particular, this research explores in depth the theory of 'regulatory capture' and examines the extent to which this is applicable to the Queensland context. A secondary issue which is explored is that of the development of a culture of nonenforcement within government departments. The testing of these theories is conducted through an analysis of the Queensland Criminal Justice Commission Inquiry into the Improper Disposal of Liquid Waste in South-East Queensland. The outcome of this thesis certainly demonstrates that state government departments responsible for environmental protection were negligent in fulfilling their roles. This thesis will highlight how such departments were 'captured' by the interests of industry to the extent that they failed to administer and enforce effective environmental legislation. It also raises the possibility that, as a result, administrators were guilty of official misconduct. Finally this thesis argues that while departmental culture is so strongly embedded in pro-development policies, responsibility for the environment should be centralised in an agency whose sole responsibility would be environmental protection. Such an agency could be an Environmental Protection Authority.

Impact and interest:

Search Google Scholar™

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 35873
Item Type: QUT Thesis (Masters by Research)
Supervisor: Hutton, Drew
Additional Information: Presented to the School of Humanities, Queensland University of Technology.
Keywords: Refuse and refuse disposal Government policy Queensland, Mineral industries Queensland Waste disposal, Corruption investigation Queensland, Groundwater Pollution Queensland, Factory and trade waste Environmental aspects Queensland, case study, culture of non-enforcement within government departments, environmental protection, environmental protection regulation, liquid waste disposal, Queensland Criminal Justice Commission Inquiry into the Improper Disposal of Liquid Wastes in South East Queensland, Queensland government policy and legislation, theory of regulatory capture, thesis, masters
Institution: Queensland University of Technology
Copyright Owner: Copyright Hayley Patrice Florence Maddin
Deposited On: 22 Sep 2010 13:03
Last Modified: 19 Jun 2017 23:51

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page