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Human and bovine adenoviruses for the detection of source-specific fecal pollution in coastal waters in Australia

Ahmed, Warish, Goonetilleke, Ashantha, & Gardner, Ted (2010) Human and bovine adenoviruses for the detection of source-specific fecal pollution in coastal waters in Australia. Water Research, 44(16), pp. 4662-4673.

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Abstract

In this study, the host-specificity and -sensitivity of human- and bovine-specific adenoviruses (HS-AVs and BS-AVs) were evaluated by testing wastewater/fecal samples from various animal species in Southeast, Queensland, Australia. The overall specificity and sensitivity of the HS-AVs marker were 1.0 and 0.78, respectively. These figures for the BS-AVs were 1.0 and 0.73, respectively. Twenty environmental water samples were colleted during wet conditions and 20 samples were colleted during dry conditions from the Maroochy Coastal River and tested for the presence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), host-specific viral markers, zoonotic bacterial and protozoan pathogens using PCR/qPCR. The concentrations of FIB in water samples collected after wet conditions were generally higher compared to dry conditions. HS-AVs was detected in 20% water samples colleted during wet conditions and whereas BS-AVs was detected in both wet (i.e., 10%) and dry (i.e., 10%) conditions. Both, C. jejuni mapA and Salmonella invA genes were detected in 10% and 10% of samples, respectively collected during dry conditions. The concentrations of Salmonella invA ranged between 3.5 × 102 to 4.3 × 102 genomic copies per 500 ml of water G. lamblia β-giardin gene was detected only in one sample (5%) collected during the dry conditions. Weak or significant correlations were observed between FIB with viral markers and zoonotic pathogens. However, during dry conditions, no significant correlations were observed between FIB concentrations with viral markers and zoonotic pathogens. The prevalence of HS-AVs in samples collected from the study river suggests that the quality of water is affected by human fecal pollution and as well as bovine fecal pollution. The results suggest that HS-AVs and BS-AVs detection using PCR could be a useful tool for the identification of human sourced fecal pollution in coastal waters.

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ID Code: 37690
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Sewerage Pollution, Faecal Indicator Bacteria, Microbial Source Tracking, Human-specific Adenoviruses, Bovine-specific Adenoviruses, Public Health Risk
DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2010.05.017
ISSN: 0043-1354
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (090700) > Environmental Engineering Design (090701)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING (090700) > Environmental Engineering Modelling (090702)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Past > Schools > School of Urban Development
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Elsevier.
Deposited On: 04 Oct 2010 11:59
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:18

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