QUT ePrints

Measuring costs of sustainability issues in highway infrastructure : perception of stakeholders in Australia

Goh, Kai Chen & Yang, Jay (2010) Measuring costs of sustainability issues in highway infrastructure : perception of stakeholders in Australia. In Second International Postgraduate Conference on Infrastructure and Environment, Faculty of Construction and Land Use, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, pp. 428-434.

[img] pending for publisher permission (PDF 244kB)
Accepted Version.
Administrators only | Request a copy from author

    View at publisher

    Abstract

    With increasing pressure to deliver environmentally friendly and socially responsible highway infrastructure projects, stakeholders are also putting significant focus on the early identification of financial viability and outcomes for these projects. Infrastructure development typically requires major capital input, which may cause serious financial constraints for investors. The push for sustainability has added new dimensions to the evaluation of highway projects, particularly on the cost front. Comprehensive analysis of the cost implications of implementing place sustainable measures in highway infrastructure throughout its lifespan is highly desirable and will become an essential part of the highway development process and a primary concern for decision makers. This paper discusses an ongoing research which seeks to identify cost elements and issues related to sustainable measures for highway infrastructure projects. Through life-cycle costing analysis (LCCA), financial implications of pursuing sustainability, which are highly concerned by the construction stakeholders, have been assessed to aid the decision making when contemplating the design, development and operation of highway infrastructure. An extensive literature review and evaluation of project reports from previous Australian highway projects was first conducted to reveal all potential cost elements. This provided the foundation for a questionnaire survey, which helped identify those specific issues and related costs that project stakeholders consider to be most critical in the Australian industry context. Through the survey, three key stakeholders in highway infrastructure development, namely consultants, contractors and government agencies, provided their views on the specific selection and priority ranking of the various categories. Findings of the survey are being integrated into proven LCCA models for further enhancement. A new LCCA model will be developed to assist the stakeholders to evaluate costs and investment decisions and reach optimum balance between financial viability and sustainability deliverables.

    Impact and interest:

    Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

    These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

    Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

    ID Code: 37901
    Item Type: Conference Paper
    Keywords: Highway, sustainability, life-cycle costing, stakeholders
    ISBN: 9789881731142
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > BUILDING (120200) > Building Construction Management and Project Planning (120201)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > BUILDING (120200) > Quantity Surveying (120203)
    Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
    Past > Schools > School of Urban Development
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
    Copyright Statement: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored and transmitted in any form, or by any means without prior written permission from the editors.
    Deposited On: 14 Oct 2010 10:02
    Last Modified: 15 Oct 2010 00:47

    Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

    Repository Staff Only: item control page