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Human optical axial length and defocus

Read, Scott A., Collins, Michael J., & Sandler, Beata (2010) Human optical axial length and defocus. Investigative Ophthalmology and Vision Science, 51(12), pp. 6262-6269.

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Abstract

Purpose: To investigate the short term influence of imposed monocular defocus upon human optical axial length (the distance from anterior cornea to retinal pigment epithelium) and ocular biometrics. Methods: Twenty-eight young adult subjects (14 myopes and 14 emmetropes) had eye biometrics measured before and then 30 and 60 minutes after exposure to monocular (right eye) defocus. Four different monocular defocus conditions were tested, each on a separate day: control (no defocus), myopic (+3 D defocus), hyperopic (-3 D defocus) and diffuse (0.2 density Bangerter filter) defocus. The fellow eye was optimally corrected (no defocus). Results: Imposed defocus caused small but significant changes in optical axial length (p<0.0001). A significant increase in optical axial length (mean change +8 ± 14 μm, p=0.03) occurred following hyperopic defocus, and a significant reduction in optical axial length (mean change -13 ± 14 μm, p=0.0001) was found following myopic defocus. A small increase in optical axial length was observed following diffuse defocus (mean change +6 ± 13 μm, p=0.053). Choroidal thickness also exhibited some significant changes with certain defocus conditions. No significant difference was found between myopes and emmetropes in the changes in optical axial length or choroidal thickness with defocus. Conclusions: Significant changes in optical axial length occur in human subjects following 60 minutes of monocular defocus. The bi-directional optical axial length changes observed in response to defocus implies the human visual system is capable of detecting the presence and sign of defocus and altering optical axial length to move the retina towards the image plane.

Impact and interest:

27 citations in Scopus
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30 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 38245
Item Type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.1167/iovs.10-5457
ISSN: 1552-5783
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Optometry & Vision Science
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology
Deposited On: 04 Nov 2010 08:54
Last Modified: 21 Jan 2013 15:40

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