QUT ePrints

A preferred music listening intervention to reduce anxiety in older adults with dementia in nursing homes

Sung, Huei-Chuan, Chang, Anne M., & Lee, Wen-Li (2010) A preferred music listening intervention to reduce anxiety in older adults with dementia in nursing homes. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 19(7-8), pp. 1056-1064.

View at publisher

Abstract

Aim: This article reports the results of a study evaluating a preferred music listening intervention for reducing anxiety in older adults with dementia in nursing homes. Background. Anxiety can have a significant negative impact on older adults’ functional status, quality of life and health care resources. However, anxiety is often under-diagnosed and inappropriately treated in those with dementia. Little is known about the use of a preferred music listening intervention for managing anxiety in those with dementia.---------- Design: A quasi-experimental pretest and posttest design was used. ---------- Methods: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a preferred music listening intervention on anxiety in older adults with dementia in nursing home. Twenty-nine participants in the experimental group received a 30-minute music listening intervention based on personal preferences delivered by trained nursing staff in mid-afternoon, twice a week for six weeks. Meanwhile, 23 participants in the control group only received usual standard care with no music. Anxiety was measured by Rating Anxiety in Dementia at baseline and week six. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to determine the effectiveness of a preferred music listening intervention on anxiety at six weeks while controlling for pretest anxiety, age and marital status. Results. ANCOVA results indicated that older adults who received the preferred music listening had a significantly lower anxiety score at six weeks compared with those who received the usual standard care with no music (F = 12Æ15, p = 0Æ001).---------- Conclusions: Preferred music listening had a positive impact by reducing the level of anxiety in older adults with dementia. Relevance to clinical practice. Nursing staff can learn how to implement preferred music intervention to provide appropriate care tailored to the individual needs of older adults with dementia. Preferred music listening is an inexpensive and viable intervention to promote mental health of those with dementia.

Impact and interest:

24 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
15 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

854 since deposited on 24 Nov 2010
331 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 38827
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: anxiety, dementia, elders, long-term care, music, nursing, older adult
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2009.03016.x
ISSN: 0962-1067
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NURSING (111000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation copyright 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd, Journal of Clinical Nursing
Deposited On: 25 Nov 2010 07:22
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:20

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page