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Adult human articular chondrocytes in a microcarrier-based culture system : expansion and redifferentiation

Schrobback, Karsten, Klein, Travis J., Scheutz, Micheal, Upton, Zee, Leavesley, David I., & Malda, Jos (2010) Adult human articular chondrocytes in a microcarrier-based culture system : expansion and redifferentiation. Journal of Orthopedic Research, 29(4), pp. 539-546.

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Abstract

xpanding human chondrocytes in vitro while maintaining their ability to form cartilage remains a key challenge in cartilage tissue engineering. One promising approach to address this is to use microcarriers as substrates for chondrocyte expansion. While microcarriers have shown beneficial effects for expansion of animal and ectopic human chondrocytes, their utility has not been determined for freshly isolated adult human articular chondrocytes. Thus, we investigated the proliferation and subsequent chondrogenic differentiation of these clinically relevant cells on porous gelatin microcarriers and compared them to those expanded using traditional monolayers. Chondrocytes attached to microcarriers within 2 days and remained viable over 4 weeks of culture in spinner flasks. Cells on microcarriers exhibited a spread morphology and initially proliferated faster than cells in monolayer culture, however, with prolonged expansion they were less proliferative. Cells expanded for 1 month and enzymatically released from microcarriers formed cartilaginous tissue in micromass pellet cultures, which was similar to tissue formed by monolayer-expanded cells. Cells left attached to microcarriers did not exhibit chondrogenic capacity. Culture conditions, such as microcarrier material, oxygen tension, and mechanical stimulation require further investigation to facilitate the efficient expansion of clinically relevant human articular chondrocytes that maintain chondrogenic potential for cartilage regeneration applications.

Impact and interest:

13 citations in Scopus
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11 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 39222
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: cartilage, tissue engineering, microcarrier, chondrocyte, dedifferentiation
DOI: 10.1002/jor.21264
ISSN: 0736-0266
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY (060100) > Cellular Interactions (incl. Adhesion Matrix Cell Wall) (060106)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > BIOCHEMISTRY AND CELL BIOLOGY (060100) > Biochemistry and Cell Biology not elsewhere classified (060199)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Orthopaedics (110314)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > MEDICAL PHYSIOLOGY (111600) > Human Biophysics (111602)
Divisions: Past > Schools > Cell & Molecular Biosciences
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Past > Schools > School of Engineering Systems
Current > Research Centres > Science Research Centre
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Orthopaedic Research Society
Deposited On: 16 Dec 2010 12:09
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 09:10

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