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Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for the treatment of co-occurring depression and substance use : current evidence and directions for future research

Hides, Leanne, Samet, Sharon, & Lubman, Dan I. (2010) Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for the treatment of co-occurring depression and substance use : current evidence and directions for future research. Drug and Alcohol Review, 29(5), pp. 508-517.

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Abstract

Issues and Approach: The high rates of co-occurring depression and substance use, and the negative impact of this on illness course and outcomes have been well established. Despite this, few clinical trials have examined the efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). This paper systematically reviews these clinical trials, with an aim of providing recommendations for how future research can develop a more robust evidence base for the treatment of these common comorbidities. Leading electronic databases, including PubMed (ISI) and PsychINFO (CSA), were searched for peer-reviewed journal articles using CBT for the treatment of co-occurring depression and substance use. Of the 55 articles identified, 12 met inclusion criteria and were included in the review. ---------- Key Findings: There is only a limited evidence for the effectiveness of CBT either alone or in combination with antidepressant medication for the treatment of co-occurring depression and substance use. While there is support for the efficacy of CBT over no treatment control conditions, there is little evidence that CBT is more efficacious than other psychotherapies. There is, however, consistent evidence of improvements in both depression and substance use outcomes, regardless of the type of treatment provided and there is growing evidence that that the effects of CBT are durable and increase over time during follow up. ---------- Conclusions. Rather than declaring the ‘dodo bird verdict’ that CBT and all other psychotherapies are equally efficacious, it would be more beneficial to develop more potent forms of CBT by identifying variables that mediate treatment outcomes.

Impact and interest:

19 citations in Scopus
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11 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 39593
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Comorbidity, Depression, Drug Abuse, Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Pharmacotherapy
DOI: 10.1111/j.1465-3362.2010.00207.x
ISSN: 0959-5236
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: © 2010 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs
Deposited On: 21 Jan 2011 09:49
Last Modified: 01 Mar 2012 00:21

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