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Can hybridization cause local extinction : the case for demographic swamping of the Australian native, Senecio pinnatifolius, by the invasive, S. madagascariensis?

Prentis, Peter, White, Evelyn, Radford, Ian J., Lowe, Andrew J., & Clarke, Anthony R. (2007) Can hybridization cause local extinction : the case for demographic swamping of the Australian native, Senecio pinnatifolius, by the invasive, S. madagascariensis? New Phytologist, 176(4), pp. 902-912.

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Abstract

The outcome of interspecific hybridization between native and invasive species depends on the relative frequencies of parental taxa and viability of hybrid progeny. We investigated individual and population level consequences of hybridization between the Australian native, Senecio pinnatifolius, and the exotic S. madagascariensis, with AFLP markers and used this information to simulate the expected outcome of hybridization.A high frequency (range 8.3-75.6 %) of hybrids was detected in open pollinated seeds of both species, but mature hybrids were absent from sympatric populations indicating that sympatric populations represent tension zones. A hybridization advantage was observed for S. madagascariensis,where significantly more progeny than expected were sired based on proportional representation of the two species in sympatric populations. Simulations indicated S. pinnatifolius could be replaced in sympatric populations if hybridization was density dependent.For this native-exotic pair, prezygotic isolating barriers are weak, but low hybrid viability maintains a strong postzygotic barrier to introgression. Due to asymmetric hybridization, S. pinnatifolius appears under threat from demographic swamping, and local extinction is possible where it occurs in sympatry with S. madagascariensis.

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22 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 40148
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), hybridization, hybrid viability, demographic swamping, invasive species, triploid
DOI: 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.02217.x
ISSN: 0028-646X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200) > Community Ecology (060202)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200) > Population Ecology (060207)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200) > Terrestrial Ecology (060208)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2007 Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Deposited On: 17 Feb 2011 11:14
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:54

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