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Household food expenditure and its contribution to socioeconomic inequalities in purchasing foods consistent with Australian dietary guideline recommendations

Miura, Kyoko & Giskes, Katrina M. (2010) Household food expenditure and its contribution to socioeconomic inequalities in purchasing foods consistent with Australian dietary guideline recommendations. Australasian Epidemiologist, 17(1), pp. 26-31.

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    Abstract

    Aim: To examine the amount of money spent on food by household income, and to ascertain whether food expenditure mediates the relationship between household income and the purchase of staple foods consistent with Australian dietary guideline recommendations. ----- -----

    Methods: In face-to-face interviews (n = 1003, 66.4% response rate), households in Brisbane, Australia were asked about their purchasing choices for a range of staple foods, including grocery items, fruits and vegetables. For each participant, information was obtained about their total weekly household food expenditure, along with their sociodemographic and household characteristics. ----- -----

    Results: Household income was significantly associated with food expenditure; participants residing in higher-income households spent more money on food per household member than those from lower-income households. Lower income households were less likely to make food purchasing choices of dietary staples that were consistent with recommendations. However, food expenditure did not attenuate the relationship between household income and the purchase of staple foods consistent with dietary guideline recommendations. ----- -----

    Conclusions: The findings suggest that food expenditure may not contribute to income inequalities in purchasing staple foods consistent with dietary guideline recommendations: instead, other material or psychosocial factors not considered in the current study may be more important determinants of these inequalities. Further research should examine whether expenditure on non-staple items and takeaway foods is a larger contributor to socioeconomic inequalities in dietary behavior.

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    ID Code: 40401
    Item Type: Journal Article
    Additional URLs:
    Keywords: food purchasing, household income, fruit and vegetable, socioeconomic, food expenditure
    ISSN: 1327-8835
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified (111199)
    Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
    Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
    Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Australasian Epidemiological Association
    Deposited On: 23 Mar 2011 14:05
    Last Modified: 02 Feb 2012 17:23

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