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A review of rationale for allocating costs and payments in producing and supplying public sector information PART A of 2 Parts – Chapters 1, 2 and 3) 13 March 2011 version

Cook, John (2011) A review of rationale for allocating costs and payments in producing and supplying public sector information PART A of 2 Parts – Chapters 1, 2 and 3) 13 March 2011 version. John Stanley Cook, Brisbane QLD. [Working Paper] (Unpublished)

Abstract

This work reviews the rationale and processes for raising revenue and allocating funds to perform information intensive activities that are pertinent to the work of democratic government. ‘Government of the people, by the people, for the people’ expresses an idea that democratic government has no higher authority than the people who agree to be bound by its rules. Democracy depends on continually learning how to develop understandings and agreements that can sustain voting majorities on which democratic law making and collective action depends. The objective expressed in constitutional terms is to deliver ‘peace, order and good government’. Meeting this objective requires a collective intellectual authority that can understand what is possible; and a collective moral authority to understand what ought to happen in practice. Facts of life determine that a society needs to retain its collective competence despite a continual turnover of its membership as people die but life goes on. Retaining this ‘collective competence’ in matters of self-government depends on each new generation: • acquiring a collective knowledge of how to produce goods and services needed to sustain a society and its capacity for self-government; • Learning how to defend society diplomatically and militarily in relation to external forces to prevent overthrow of its self-governing capacity; and • Learning how to defend society against divisive internal forces to preserve the authority of representative legislatures, allow peaceful dispute resolution and maintain social cohesion.

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ID Code: 40727
Item Type: Working Paper
Keywords: information economics, information infrastructure, governance, government, sociology, communications theory, information networks
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > DISTRIBUTED COMPUTING (080500)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > INFORMATION SYSTEMS (080600) > Information Systems Organisation (080610)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BUILT ENVIRONMENT AND DESIGN (120000) > DESIGN PRACTICE AND MANAGEMENT (120300) > Design Practice and Management not elsewhere classified (120399)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > Economic Theory (140100) > History of Economic Thought (140101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > Economic Theory (140100) > Macroeconomic Theory (140102)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > Economic Theory (140100) > Microeconomic Theory (140104)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > APPLIED ECONOMICS (140200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > APPLIED ECONOMICS (140200) > Economic History (140203)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > OTHER ECONOMICS (149900) > Ecological Economics (149902)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ECONOMICS (140000) > OTHER ECONOMICS (149900) > Heterodox Economics (149903)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Australian Government and Politics (160601)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN HUMAN SOCIETY (160000) > POLITICAL SCIENCE (160600) > Environmental Politics (160605)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > COGNITIVE SCIENCE (170200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > LINGUISTICS (200400)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Schools > School of Law
Copyright Owner: Collaborative Research Centre – Spatial Information (CRC-SI2)
Copyright Statement: © 2011 Collaborative Research Centre – Spatial Information (CRC-SI2) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Australia License. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/au/
Deposited On: 14 Mar 2011 11:37
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2011 21:08

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