QUT ePrints

Clinical supervision: Its influence on client-rated working alliance and client symptom reduction in the brief treatment of major depression

Bambling, Matthew, King, Robert, Raue, Patrick, Schweitzer, Robert, & Lambert, Warren (2006) Clinical supervision: Its influence on client-rated working alliance and client symptom reduction in the brief treatment of major depression. Psychotherapy Research, 16(3), pp. 317-331.

View at publisher

Abstract

Supervision of psychotherapists and counselors, especially in the early years of practice, is widely accepted as being important for professional development and to ensure optimal client outcomes. Although the process of clinical supervision has been extensively studied, less is known about the impact of supervision on psychotherapy practice and client symptom outcome. This study evaluated the impact of clinical supervision on client working alliance and symptom reduction in the brief treatment of major depression. The authors randomly assigned 127 clients with a diagnosis of major depression to 127 supervised or unsupervised therapists to receive eight sessions of problems-solving treatment. Supervised therapists were randomly assigned to either alliance skill/ or alliance process/focused supervision and received eight supervision sessions. Before beginning treatment, therapists received one supervision session for brief training in the working alliance supervision approach and in specific characteristics of each case. Standard measures of therapeutic alliance and symptom change were used as dependent variables. The results showed a significant effect for both supervision conditions on working alliance from the first session of therapy, symptom reduction, and treatment retention and evaluation but no effect differences between supervision conditions. It was not possible to separate the effects of supervision from the single pretreatment session and is possible that allegiance effects might have inflated results. The scientific and clinical relevance of these findings is discussed.

Impact and interest:

52 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
36 citations in Web of Science®

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 4106
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: For more information, please refer to the journal’s website (see link) or contact the author. Author contact details: r.schweitzer@qut.edu.au
DOI: 10.1080/10503300500268524
ISSN: 1468-4381
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2006 Taylor & Francis
Copyright Statement: First published in Psychotherapy Research 16(3):pp. 317-331.
Deposited On: 16 May 2006
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:27

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page