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Pressure, oxygen tension and temperature in the periosteal callus during bone healing - An in vivo study in sheep

Epari, Devakara, Lienau, Jasmine , Schell, Hanna , Witt, Florian , & Duda, Georg (2008) Pressure, oxygen tension and temperature in the periosteal callus during bone healing - An in vivo study in sheep. Bone, 43(4), pp. 734-739.

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Abstract

Adequate blood supply and sufficient mechanical stability are necessary for timely fracture healing. Damage to vessels impairs blood supply; hindering the transport of oxygen which is an essential metabolite for cells involved in repair. The degree of mechanical stability determines the mechanical conditions in the healing tissues. The mechanical conditions can influence tissue differentiation and may also inhibit revascularization. Knowledge of the actual conditions in a healing fracture in vivo is extremely limited. This study aimed to quantify the pressure, oxygen tension and temperature in the external callus during the early phase of bone healing. Six Merino-mix sheep underwent a tibial osteotomy. The tibia was stabilized with a standard mono-lateral external fixator. A multi-parameter catheter was placed adjacent to the osteotomy gap on the medial aspect of the tibia. Measurements of oxygen tension and temperature were performed for ten days post-op. Measurements of pressure were performed during gait on days three and seven. The ground reaction force and the interfragmentary movements were measured simultaneously. The maximum pressure during gait increased (p=0.028) from three (41.3 [29.2-44.1] mm Hg) to seven days (71.8 [61.8-84.8] mm Hg). During the same interval, there was no change (p=0.92) in the peak ground reaction force or in the interfragmentary movement (compression: p=0.59 and axial rotation: p=0.11). Oxygen tension in the haematoma (74.1 mm Hg [68.6-78.5]) was initially high post-op and decreased steadily over the first five days. The temperature increased over the first four days before reaching a plateau at approximately 38.5 degrees C on day four. This study is the first to report pressure, oxygen tension and temperature in the early callus tissues. The magnitude of pressure increased even though weight bearing and IFM remained unchanged. Oxygen tensions were initially high in the haematoma and fell gradually with a low oxygen environment first established after four to five days. This study illustrates that in bone healing the local environment for cells may not be considered constant with regard to oxygen tension, pressure and temperature.

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21 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 41299
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Fracture healing, Mechano-biology, In vivo pressure, In vivo oxygen tension, Fracture callus
DOI: 10.1016/j.bone.2008.06.007
ISSN: 8756-3282
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (090300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PAEDIATRICS AND REPRODUCTIVE MEDICINE (111400)
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2008 Elsevier
Deposited On: 15 Apr 2011 10:51
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 23:57

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