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Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia

Krosch, Matt, Baker, Andrew, Mather, Peter B., & Cranston, Peter (2011) Spatial population genetic structure reveals strong natal site fidelity in Echinocladius martini (Diptera: Chironomidae) in northeast Queensland, Australia. Freshwater Biology, 56(7), pp. 1328-1341.

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    Abstract

    1. A diverse array of patterns has been reported regarding the spatial extent of population genetic structure and effective dispersal in freshwater macroinvertebrates. In river systems, the movements of many taxa can be restricted to varying degrees by the natural stream channel hierarchy.
    2. In this study, we sampled populations of the non-biting freshwater midge Echinocladius martini in the Paluma bioregion of tropical northeast Queensland to investigate fine scale patterns of within- and among-stream dispersal and gene flow within a purported historical refuge. We amplified a 639 bp fragment of mitochondrial COI and analysed genetic structure using pairwise ΦST, hierarchical AMOVA, Mantel tests and a parsimony network. Genetic variation was partitioned among stream sections using Streamtree to investigate the effect of potential instream dispersal barriers.
    3. The data revealed strong natal site fidelity and significant differentiation among neighbouring, geographically proximate streams. We found evidence for only episodic adult flight among sites on separate stream reaches. Overall, however, our data suggested that both larval and adult dispersal was largely limited to within a stream channel.
    4. This may arise from a combination of the high density of riparian vegetation physically restricting dispersal and from the joint effects of habitat stability and large population sizes. Together these may mitigate the requirement for movement among streams to avoid inbreeding and local extinction due to habitat change and may thus enable persistence of upstream populations in the absence of regular compensatory upstream flight. Taken together, these data suggest that dispersal of E. martini is highly restricted, to the scale of only a few kilometres, and hence occurs predominantly within the natal stream.

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    5 citations in Scopus
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    6 citations in Web of Science®

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    ID Code: 42095
    Item Type: Journal Article
    Keywords: Freshwater, Wet Tropics, dispersal, downstream drift, lotic
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2427.2010.02571.x
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > ECOLOGY (060200) > Freshwater Ecology (060204)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES (060000) > GENETICS (060400) > Population Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics (060411)
    Divisions: Past > Schools > Biogeoscience
    Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Blackwell Publishing.
    Deposited On: 24 Jun 2011 16:59
    Last Modified: 25 Jun 2011 20:25

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