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YouTube versus the national film and sound archive: Which is the more useful resource for historians of Australian television?

McKee, Alan (2011) YouTube versus the national film and sound archive: Which is the more useful resource for historians of Australian television? Television and New Media, 12(2), pp. 154-173.

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Abstract

This article compares YouTube and the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA) as resources for television historians interested in viewing old Australian television programs. The author searched for seventeen important television programs, identified in a previous research project, to compare what was available in the two archives and how easy it was to find. The analysis focused on differences in curatorial practices of accessioning and cataloguing. NFSA is stronger in current affairs and older programs, while YouTube is stronger in game shows and lifestyle programs. YouTube is stronger than the NFSA on “human interest” material—births, marriages, and deaths. YouTube accessioning more strongly accords with popular histories of Australian television. Both NFSA and YouTube offer complete episodes of programs, while YouTube also offers many short clips of “moments.” YouTube has more surprising pieces of rare ephemera. YouTube cataloguing is more reliable than that of the NFSA, with fewer broken links. The YouTube metadata can be searched more intuitively. The NFSA generally provides more useful reference information about production and broadcast dates.

Impact and interest:

5 citations in Scopus
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5 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 43257
Item Type: Journal Article
Funders: ARC
Keywords: archives, curating, democratic digital archives, popular history, television history, YouTube
DOI: 10.1177/1527476410365707
ISSN: 1527-4764
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > STUDIES IN CREATIVE ARTS AND WRITING (190000) > FILM TELEVISION AND DIGITAL MEDIA (190200)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > CULTURAL STUDIES (200200)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
Past > Institutes > Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation
Funding:
Deposited On: 13 Jul 2011 23:10
Last Modified: 02 Oct 2014 11:31

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