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Preferences of first-time expectant mothers for care of their child : 'I wouldn't leave them somewhere that made me feel insecure'

Boyd, Wendy A., Thorpe, Karen J., & Tayler, Collette P. (2010) Preferences of first-time expectant mothers for care of their child : 'I wouldn't leave them somewhere that made me feel insecure'. Australasian Journal of Early Childhood, 35(2), pp. 4-12.

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Abstract

Australia has witnessed a continual increase in maternal employment over the past two decades, which places focus on both supply of childcare and a demand for high quality care. This study examined childcare preferences regarding the return to paid work of 124 Australian women who were expecting their first child. In contrast with most studies that have retrospective designs, the design of this study presents the perspectives of women prior to the birth of their first child-that is, before they have made a final decision about child care. This study found that the majority (78 per cent) of the women intended to re-commence work within the 12 months after the birth of their child. There were two factors that were the most salient features in their decision making-the quality of care and the personal satisfaction of engaging in paid work. The findings suggest that family friendly employment practices and access to secure, high-quality child care are key to women's secure participation in the paid workforce.

Impact and interest:

5 citations in Scopus
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3 citations in Web of Science®

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34 since deposited on 13 Jul 2011
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ID Code: 43277
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Childcare, Women in Paid Workforce
ISSN: 0312-5033
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EDUCATION (130000) > EDUCATION SYSTEMS (130100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Social and Community Psychology (170113)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2010 Early Childhood Australia
Copyright Statement: Copyright of Australasian Journal of Early Childhood is the property of Early Childhood Australia and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.) Copyright of Australasian Journal of Early Childhood is the property of Early Childhood Australia and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use.
Deposited On: 13 Jul 2011 23:11
Last Modified: 06 Dec 2012 04:12

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