Supportive-expressive group therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer: Improving access for Australian women through use of teleconference

O'Brien, Mary, Harris,, Jill, King, Robert, & O'Brien, Tom (2008) Supportive-expressive group therapy for women with metastatic breast cancer: Improving access for Australian women through use of teleconference. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 1(8), pp. 28-35.

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Abstract

While supportive-expressive group therapy (SEGT) has been found to be effective in significantly reducing distress associated with life-threatening illness, the challenge in Australia is to develop a means of providing supportive interventions to rural women who may be isolated both by the experience of illness and by geographical location. In this study an adaptation of SEGT was provided to women with metastatic breast cancer (n =21), who attended face-to-face or by telephone conference call. Participants showed significant gains on standardised measures of well-being, including a reduction in negative affect and an increase in positive affect, over a 12-month period. A reduction in intrusive and avoidant stress symptoms was also observed over 12 months; however, this difference was not significant. These outcomes suggest that SEGT, delivered in an innovative way within a community setting, may be an effective means of moderating the adverse effects of a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer while improving access to supportive care for rural women. These results are considered exploratory, as the study did not include a matched control group.

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ID Code: 44060
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1080/14733140801889071
ISSN: 1473-3145
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Taylor & Francis
Deposited On: 12 Oct 2011 05:47
Last Modified: 29 Feb 2012 14:36

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