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Persistent ocean monitoring with underwater gliders : adapting sampling resolution

Smith, Ryan N., Schwager, Mac, Smith, Stephen L., Jones, Burton H., Rus, Daniela, & Sukhatme, Gaurav S. (2011) Persistent ocean monitoring with underwater gliders : adapting sampling resolution. Journal of Field Robotics, 28(5), pp. 714-741.

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Abstract

Ocean processes are dynamic, complex, and occur on multiple spatial and temporal scales. To obtain a synoptic view of such processes, ocean scientists collect data over long time periods. Historically, measurements were continually provided by fixed sensors, e.g., moorings, or gathered from ships. Recently, an increase in the utilization of autonomous underwater vehicles has enabled a more dynamic data acquisition approach. However, we still do not utilize the full capabilities of these vehicles. Here we present algorithms that produce persistent monitoring missions for underwater vehicles by balancing path following accuracy and sampling resolution for a given region of interest, which addresses a pressing need among ocean scientists to efficiently and effectively collect high-value data. More specifically, this paper proposes a path planning algorithm and a speed control algorithm for underwater gliders, which together give informative trajectories for the glider to persistently monitor a patch of ocean. We optimize a cost function that blends two competing factors: maximize the information value along the path, while minimizing deviation from the planned path due to ocean currents. Speed is controlled along the planned path by adjusting the pitch angle of the underwater glider, so that higher resolution samples are collected in areas of higher information value. The resulting paths are closed circuits that can be repeatedly traversed to collect long-term ocean data in dynamic environments. The algorithms were tested during sea trials on an underwater glider operating off the coast of southern California, as well as in Monterey Bay, California. The experimental results show significant improvements in data resolution and path reliability compared to previously executed sampling paths used in the respective regions.

Impact and interest:

28 citations in Scopus
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17 citations in Web of Science®

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35 since deposited on 22 Aug 2011
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ID Code: 44099
Item Type: Journal Article
Additional URLs:
Keywords: Autonomous Underwater Vehicle, Path Planning, Persistent Monitoring, Ocean observation, Slocum glider
DOI: 10.1002/rob.20405
ISSN: 1556-4967
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES (010000) > NUMERICAL AND COMPUTATIONAL MATHEMATICS (010300) > Optimisation (010303)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EARTH SCIENCES (040000) > OCEANOGRAPHY (040500) > Biological Oceanography (040501)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > EARTH SCIENCES (040000) > OCEANOGRAPHY (040500) > Physical Oceanography (040503)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND IMAGE PROCESSING (080100) > Adaptive Agents and Intelligent Robotics (080101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > MARITIME ENGINEERING (091100) > Ocean Engineering (091103)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > MARITIME ENGINEERING (091100) > Special Vehicles (091106)
Divisions: Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Built Environment and Engineering
Past > Schools > School of Engineering Systems
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Wiley-Blackwell and the authors
Deposited On: 22 Aug 2011 10:31
Last Modified: 07 Aug 2012 03:14

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