QUT ePrints

Can identified stressors be used to predict profession for mental health professionals?

King, Robert, Lloyd, Chris, & Holewa, Verina (2008) Can identified stressors be used to predict profession for mental health professionals? Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, 7(2), pp. 97-103.

View at publisher

Abstract

A difference appears to exist between stressors reported for nurses and allied health professionals working in mental health. Prominent stressors for mental health nurses include workload, administration duties and a lack of resources. Whilst these also appear to be stressors for allied health professionals, the stressor 'professional self-doubt' has also been reported for social workers.

This study aimed to examine the extent to which community mental health professionals could be identified as belonging to the nursing profession or an allied health profession based on their perceived sources of stress. Ninety-eight community mental health nurses and 85 allied health professionals working in Victoria's public mental health services completed the Mental Health Professionals Stress Scale. Discriminant analysis was utilised to test the predictive value of stressors to identify profession. The main stressors reported by nurses were workload, a lack of resources and organisational problems. For allied health professionals the highest reported stressors were workload, a lack of resources, client related difficulties and organisational problems.

Mental health professionals in this study could not be identified as belonging to the nursing profession or an allied health profession based on their identified sources of stress. It could well be reflective of the shift to homogenous roles in mental health services. With this being the case, there may be benefits in implementing stress reducing strategies at an organisational level.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 46430
Item Type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.5172/jamh.7.2.97
ISSN: 1753-0180
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Pavilion Publishing Ltd.
Deposited On: 12 Oct 2011 15:39
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2014 13:51

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page