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The effect of various temperature indicators on different mortality categories in a subtropical city of Brisbane, Australia.

Yu, Weiwei, Guo, Yuming, Ye, Xiaofang, Wang, Xiao Yu, Huang, Cunrui, Pan, Xiaochuan , & Tong, Shilu (2011) The effect of various temperature indicators on different mortality categories in a subtropical city of Brisbane, Australia. Science of the Total Environment, 409(18), pp. 3431-3437.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between temperature and mortality has been explored for decades and many temperature indicators have been applied separately. However, few data are available to show how the effects of different temperature indicators on different mortality categories, particularly in a typical subtropical climate.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess the associations between various temperature indicators and different mortality categories in Brisbane, Australia during 1996-2004.

METHODS:

We applied two methods to assess the threshold and temperature indicator for each age and death groups: mean temperature and the threshold assessed from all cause mortality was used for all mortality categories; the specific temperature indicator and the threshold for each mortality category were identified separately according to the minimisation of AIC. We conducted polynomial distributed lag non-linear model to identify effect estimates in mortality with one degree of temperature increase (or decrease) above (or below) the threshold on current days and lagged effects using both methods.

RESULTS:

Akaike's Information Criterion was minimized when mean temperature was used for all non-external deaths and deaths from 75 to 84 years; when minimum temperature was used for deaths from 0 to 64 years, 65-74 years, ≥ 85 years, and from the respiratory diseases; when maximum temperature was used for deaths from cardiovascular diseases. The effect estimates using certain temperature indicators were similar as mean temperature both for current day and lag effects.

CONCLUSION:

Different age groups and death categories were sensitive to different temperature indicators. However, the effect estimates from certain temperature indicators did not significantly differ from those of mean temperature.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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4 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 46571
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: cardiovascular mortality, respiratory mortality, temperature, lag effect, the elderly
DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.05.027
ISSN: 0048-9697
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety (111705)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Elsiver
Copyright Statement: NOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Science of The Total Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Science of The Total Environment, [VOL 409, ISSUE 18, 2011 DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2011.05.027 Reference: http://www.elsevier.
Deposited On: 26 Oct 2011 09:27
Last Modified: 27 Oct 2011 19:05

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