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The right to be green: using human rights law to achieve environmental protection

Lewis, Bridget (2011) The right to be green: using human rights law to achieve environmental protection. In Earth Jurisprudence : Building Theory and Practice : Australia’s Third Wild Law Conference, 16-18 September, 2011, Griffith University, Brisbane, Australia. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

The relationship between the environment and human rights has long been recognised. It is now largely accepted that a ‘good’ environment is a necessary precondition for the enjoyment of a wide range of human rights, including the right to health, the right to an adequate standard of living, and even the right to life. It has even been suggested that as humans we all possess a right to live in an environment of a certain standard, based on the intrinsic value of the natural world to all human beings. In this context much has been written regarding the important role that the environment plays in human lives. This paper looks at the flip-side of this discussion, and examines what human rights can do for the environment. It is argued that, while there are valid criticisms for linking environmental protection too strongly to human needs, there is nonetheless much to be gained from using human rights law as a framework to achieve environmental protection.

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ID Code: 46688
Item Type: Conference Item (Presentation)
Additional URLs:
Keywords: human rights, environment, wild law
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Environmental and Natural Resources Law (180111)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Human Rights Law (180114)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LAW AND LEGAL STUDIES (180000) > LAW (180100) > Legal Theory Jurisprudence and Legal Interpretation (180122)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Law
Current > Research Centres > Law and Justice Research Centre
Current > Schools > School of Law
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 please consult author
Deposited On: 31 Oct 2011 08:53
Last Modified: 31 Oct 2011 08:54

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