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Women, drinking and aggression on a night out : do girls just wanna have fun?

Palk, Gavan R., Cocker, Trista, & Freeman, James E. (2011) Women, drinking and aggression on a night out : do girls just wanna have fun? In APS Forensic Psychology National Conference, 4-6 August 2011, Outrigger Little Hastings Street Resort & Spa, Noosa, QLD. (In Press)

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Abstract

Alcohol misuse and violence is a major public safety concern. Although the extent and nature of alcohol-related violence has been examined there is a paucity of research surrounding the ongoing construction and re-construction of gender identity and its relationship to aggression and alcohol consumption. A social constructionist perspective was used to explore women’s perceptions and experiences of drinking alcohol and incidents of public violence and aggression. Two methods were used. Firstly, an exploratory study consisting of three in-depth interviews and three focus groups to examine the ideas women constructed in relation to their experiences; and further, an online survey to explore self-reported drinking patterns among men and women. The main themes emerging from the qualitative material were ‘planned drinking to excess’ (incorporating the rituals of a ‘pre-drink’ routine), and perceptions of appropriate feminine behaviour (particularly in relation to excessive drinking and alcohol related aggression in and around licensed venues). The survey data indicated that men continue to consume more alcohol and at higher levels than women, while women’s involvement in aggressive incidents on a night out being similar to that of men. Both genders considered that women’s involvement in aggressive incidents in and around licensed venues as ‘unfeminine’. Understanding drinking as a socially constructed activity adds to our understanding of the meaning of drinking for women, and in particular, young women. This perspective may allow more focussed initiatives to address the social and health related harms associated with drinking in and around licensed venues.

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ID Code: 47061
Item Type: Conference Item (Presentation)
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Forensic Psychology (170104)
Divisions: Current > Research Centres > Centre for Accident Research & Road Safety - Qld (CARRS-Q)
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Deposited On: 18 Nov 2011 08:51
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2011 08:51

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