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A prospective surveillance model for rehabilitation for women with breast cancer

Stout, Nicole L., Binkley, Jill, Schmitz, Kathryn H., Andrews, Kimberly, Hayes, Sandra C., Campbell, Kristin, McNeely, Margaret, Soballe, Peter W., Berger, Ann M., Cheville, Andrea L., Fabian, Carol, Gerber, Lynn, Harris, Susan R., Johansson, Karin, Pusic, Andrea L., Prosnitz, Robert G., & Smith, Robert (2012) A prospective surveillance model for rehabilitation for women with breast cancer. Cancer, 118(8), pp. 2191-2200.

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    Abstract

    Background: The current model of care for breast cancer is focused on disease treatment followed by ongoing recurrence surveillance. This approach lacks attention to the patients’ physical and functional well-being. Breast cancer treatment sequelae can lead to physical impairments and functional limitations. Common impairments include pain, fatigue, upper extremity dysfunction, lymphedema, weakness, joint arthralgia, neuropathy, weight gain, cardiovascular effects, and osteoporosis. Evidence supports prospective surveillance for early identification and treatment as a means to prevent or mitigate many of these concerns.

    Purpose: This paper proposes a prospective surveillance model for physical rehabilitation and exercise that can be integrated with disease treatment to create a more comprehensive approach to survivorship health care. The goals of the model are to promote surveillance for common physical impairments and functional limitations associated with breast cancer treatment, to provide education to facilitate early identification of impairments, to introduce rehabilitation and exercise intervention when physical impairments are identified and to promote and support physical activity and exercise behaviors through the trajectory of disease treatment and survivorship.

    Methods: The model is the result of a multi-disciplinary meeting of research and clinical experts in breast cancer survivorship and representatives of relevant professional and advocacy organizations.

    Outcomes: The proposed model identifies time points during breast cancer care for assessment of and education about physical impairments. Ultimately, implementation of the model may influence incidence and severity of breast cancer treatment related physical impairments. As such, the model seeks to optimize function during and following treatment and positively influence a growing survivorship community.

    Impact and interest:

    31 citations in Scopus
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    22 citations in Web of Science®

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    ID Code: 48398
    Item Type: Journal Article
    Keywords: Breast Cancer, Rehabilitation, Sequelae, Surveillance
    DOI: 10.1002/cncr.27476
    ISSN: 1097-0142
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Rehabilitation and Therapy (excl. Physiotherapy) (110321)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200) > Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified (111299)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified (111799)
    Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
    Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
    Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 American Cancer Society
    Deposited On: 03 Feb 2012 10:20
    Last Modified: 28 Jun 2012 07:44

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