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The moderator effect of cognitive modifiability on a traditional undergraduate admissions test for disadvantaged Black students in South Africa

Shochet, Ian M. (1994) The moderator effect of cognitive modifiability on a traditional undergraduate admissions test for disadvantaged Black students in South Africa. South African Journal of Psychology, 24(4), pp. 208-215.

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Abstract

Contends that South African universities must find admissions criteria, other than high school grades, that are both fair and valid for Black applicants severely disadvantaged by an inferior school education. The use of traditional intellectual assessments and aptitude tests for disadvantaged and minority students remains controversial as a fair assessment; they do not take account of potential for change. In this study, therefore, a measure of students' cognitive modifiability, assessed by means of an interactive assessment model, was added as a moderator of traditional intellectual assessment in predicting 1st-yr university success. Cognitive modifiability significantly moderated the predictive validity of the traditional intellectual assessment for 52 disadvantaged Black students. The higher the level of cognitive modifiability, the less effective were traditional methods for predicting academic success and vice versa.

Impact and interest:

2 citations in Web of Science®
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ID Code: 49541
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: Academic Achievement Prediction, Disadvantaged, Entrance Examinations, Learning Ability, Adulthood
ISSN: 0081-2463
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Deposited On: 24 May 2012 10:27
Last Modified: 24 May 2012 10:27

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