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Concept combination and the origins of complex cognition

Gabora, Liane & Kitto, Kirsty (2013) Concept combination and the origins of complex cognition. In Swan, Liz (Ed.) Origins of Mind. Springer , Dordrecht, pp. 361-381.

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    Abstract

    At the core of our uniquely human cognitive abilities is the capacity to see things from different perspectives, or to place them in a new context. We propose that this was made possible by two cognitive transitions. First, the large brain of Homo erectus facilitated the onset of recursive recall: the ability to string thoughts together into a stream of potentially abstract or imaginative thought. This hypothesis is sup-ported by a set of computational models where an artificial society of agents evolved to generate more diverse and valuable cultural outputs under conditions of recursive recall. We propose that the capacity to see things in context arose much later, following the appearance of anatomically modern humans. This second transition was brought on by the onset of contextual focus: the capacity to shift between a minimally contextual analytic mode of thought, and a highly contextual associative mode of thought, conducive to combining concepts in new ways and ‘breaking out of a rut’. When contextual focus is implemented in an art-generating computer program, the resulting artworks are seen as more creative and appealing. We summarize how both transitions can be modeled using a theory of concepts which high-lights the manner in which different contexts can lead to modern humans attributing very different meanings to the interpretation of one concept.

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    ID Code: 50629
    Item Type: Book Chapter
    Keywords: context, creativity, origins of mind, conceptual combination, contexual focus
    DOI: 10.1007/978-94-007-5419-5_19
    ISBN: 978-94-007-5418-8
    Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND IMAGE PROCESSING (080100) > Artificial Life (080102)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > INFORMATION AND COMPUTING SCIENCES (080000) > ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE AND IMAGE PROCESSING (080100) > Simulation and Modelling (080110)
    Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > COGNITIVE SCIENCE (170200) > Linguistic Processes (incl. Speech Production and Comprehension) (170204)
    Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Information Systems
    Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
    Funding:
    Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Springer
    Deposited On: 29 May 2012 11:02
    Last Modified: 23 May 2014 17:19

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