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More than a backchannel : Twitter and television

Harrington, Stephen, Highfield, Tim, & Bruns, Axel (2012) More than a backchannel : Twitter and television. In Noguera, José Manuel (Ed.) Audience Interactivity and Participation. COST Action ISO906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies, Brussels, Belgium, pp. 13-17.

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      Abstract

      Twitter is a social media service that has managed very successfully to embed itself deeply in the everyday lives of its users. Its short message length (140 characters), and one-way connections (‘following’ rather than ‘friending’) lend themselves effectively to random and regular updates on almost any form of personal or professional activity – and it has found uses from the interpersonal (e.g. boyd et al., 2010) through crisis communication (e.g. Bruns et al., 2012) to political debate (e.g. Burgess & Bruns, 2012). In such uses, Twitter does not necessarily replace existing media channels, such as the broadcast or online offerings of the mainstream media, but often complements them, providing its users with alternative opportunities to contribute more actively to the wider mediasphere. This is true especially where Twitter is used alongside television, as a simple backchannel to live programming or for more sophisticated uses. In this article, we outline four aspects – dimensions – of the way that the ‘old’ medium of television intersects and, in some cases, interacts, with the ‘new’ medium of Twitter.

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      ID Code: 51326
      Item Type: Book Chapter
      Keywords: audience research, consumption, new media, television, Twitter
      ISBN: 9782960115758
      Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies (200102)
      Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > LANGUAGES COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE (200000) > COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA STUDIES (200100) > Media Studies (200104)
      Divisions: Current > Research Centres > ARC Centre of Excellence for Creative Industries and Innovation
      Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Creative Industries Faculty
      Past > Institutes > Institute for Creative Industries and Innovation
      Current > Schools > Journalism, Media & Communication
      Current > Schools > School of Media, Entertainment & Creative Arts
      Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 COST Action ISO906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies
      Deposited On: 03 Jul 2012 09:32
      Last Modified: 25 May 2013 03:56

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