QUT ePrints

Incipient neurovulnerability and neuroprotection in early psychosis : a proton spectroscopy study of the anterior hippocampus at 3Tesla

Berger, G.E., Wood, S., Wellard, R.M., Pantelis, C., Proffitt, T., McCronchie, M., Monfries, R., Velakoulis, D., Brewer, W., Jackson, G., & McGorry, P.D. (2003) Incipient neurovulnerability and neuroprotection in early psychosis : a proton spectroscopy study of the anterior hippocampus at 3Tesla. Schizophrenia Research, 60(1), p. 238.

View at publisher

Abstract

Programmed cell death (PCD) and progenitor cell generation (of glial and in some brain areas also neuronal fate) in the CNS is an active process throughout life and is generally not associated with gliosis which means that PCD can be pathologically silent. The striking discovery that progenitor cell generation (of glial and in some brain areas neuronal fate) is widespread in the adult CNS (especially the hippocampus) suggest a much more dynamic scenario than previously thought and transcends the dichotomy between neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative models of schizophrenia and related disorders. We suggest that the regulatory processes that control the regulation of PCD and the generation of progenitor cells may be disturbed in the early phase of psychotic disorders underpinning a disconnectivity syndrom at the onset of clinically overt disorders. An ongoing 1H-MRS study of the anterior hippocampus at 3 Tesla in mostly drug-naive first-episode psychosis patients suggests no change in NAA, but significant increases in myo-inositol and lactate. The data suggests that neuronal integrity in the anterior hippocampus is still intact at the early stage of illness or mainly only functionally impaired. However the increase in lactate and myo-inositol may reflect a potential disturbance of generation and PCD of progenitor cells (of glial and in selected brain areas also neuronal fate) at the onset of psychosis. If true the use of neuroprotective agents such as lithium or eicosapentaenoic acid (which inhibit PCD and support cell generation)in the early phase of psychotic disorders may be a potent treatment avenue to explore.

Impact and interest:

0 citations in Web of Science®
Search Google Scholar™

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

ID Code: 51340
Item Type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.1016/s0920-9964(03)81237-9
ISSN: 09209964
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Radiology and Organ Imaging (110320)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900) > Central Nervous System (110903)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Biological Psychology (Neuropsychology Psychopharmacology Physiological Psychology) (170101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > COGNITIVE SCIENCE (170200) > Neurocognitive Patterns and Neural Networks (170205)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Chemistry, Physics & Mechanical Engineering
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Deposited On: 03 Jul 2012 06:02
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2012 06:02

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page