QUT ePrints

Measuring reef complexity and rugosity from monocular video bathymetric reconstruction

He, Hu, Ferrari, Renata, McKinnon, David, Roff, George, Mumby, Peter, Smith, Ryan, & Upcroft, Ben (2012) Measuring reef complexity and rugosity from monocular video bathymetric reconstruction. In Proceedings of the 12th International Coral Reef Symposium, James Cook University, Cairns, Australia, pp. 1-5.

View at publisher

Abstract

Topographic structural complexity of a reef is highly correlated to coral growth rates, coral cover and overall levels of biodiversity, and is therefore integral in determining ecological processes. Modeling these processes commonly includes measures of rugosity obtained from a wide range of different survey techniques that often fail to capture rugosity at different spatial scales. Here we show that accurate estimates of rugosity can be obtained from video footage captured using underwater video cameras (i.e., monocular video). To demonstrate the accuracy of our method, we compared the results to in situ measurements of a 2m x 20m area of forereef from Glovers Reef atoll in Belize. Sequential pairs of images were used to compute fine scale bathymetric reconstructions of the reef substrate from which precise measurements of rugosity and reef topographic structural complexity can be derived across multiple spatial scales. To achieve accurate bathymetric reconstructions from uncalibrated monocular video, the position of the camera for each image in the video sequence and the intrinsic parameters (e.g., focal length) must be computed simultaneously. We show that these parameters can be often determined when the data exhibits parallax-type motion, and that rugosity and reef complexity can be accurately computed from existing video sequences taken from any type of underwater camera from any reef habitat or location. This technique provides an infinite array of possibilities for future coral reef research by providing a cost-effective and automated method of determining structural complexity and rugosity in both new and historical video surveys of coral reefs.

Impact and interest:

Citation countsare sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

142 since deposited on 31 Jul 2012
76 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloadsdisplays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 52839
Item Type: Conference Paper
Keywords: Coral Reef, 3D reconstruction, Monocular video, Structural Complexity
ISBN: 978-0-9808572-5-2
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > MARITIME ENGINEERING (091100)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Past > QUT Faculties & Divisions > Faculty of Science and Technology
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 (please consult the authors).
Deposited On: 31 Jul 2012 12:50
Last Modified: 02 Aug 2012 09:31

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page