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Patient-practitioner relationships desired by overweight/obese adults

Leske, Stuart, Strodl, Esben, & Hou, Xiang-Yu (2012) Patient-practitioner relationships desired by overweight/obese adults. Patient Education and Counseling, 89(2), pp. 309-315.

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Abstract

Objective: This study investigated the characteristics of the patient-practitioner relationship desired by overweight/obese individuals in weight management. The aim was to identify characteristics of the relationship which empower patients to make lifestyle changes.

Methods: Grounded theory was used inductively to build a model of the patient-practitioner relationship based on the perspectives of 21 overweight/obese ¬adults.

Results: Emerging from the match between patient and practitioner characteristics, collaboration was the key process explicitly occurring in the patient-practitioner relationship, and was characterised by two subcategories; perceived power dimensions and openness. Trust emerged implicitly from the collaborative process, being fostered by relational, informational, and credible aspects of the interaction. Patient trust in their practitioner consequently led to empowering outcomes including goal ownership and perceiving the utility of changes.

Conclusion: An appropriate match between patient and practitioner characteristics facilitates collaboration which leads to trust, both of which appear to precede empowering outcomes for patients such as goal ownership and perceiving the utility of changes. Collaboration is an explicit process and precedes the patient trusting their practitioner.

Practice implications: Practitioners should be sensitive to patient preferences for collaboration and the opportunity to develop trust with patients relationally, through information provision, and modelling a healthy lifestyle.

Impact and interest:

1 citations in Scopus
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ID Code: 53175
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: patient-practitioner trust , overweight, obesity, collaboration, grounded theory, empowerment, adults
DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2012.07.002
ISSN: 0738-3991
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Health Counselling (111710)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Primary Health Care (111717)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd
Copyright Statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Patient Education and Counseling. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Patient Education and Counseling, [Vol: 89(2), (2012)] DOI: 10.1016/j.pec.2012.07.002
Deposited On: 17 Aug 2012 08:19
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2013 10:18

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