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Travel behavior of workers in Dhaka and their attitude towards road pricing

Nasrin, Sharmin, Bunker, Jonathan M., & Miska, Marc (2012) Travel behavior of workers in Dhaka and their attitude towards road pricing. In Chong, Lydia (Ed.) 25th ARRB Conference, ARRB Group Ltd, Pan Pacific Hotel, Perth, WA.

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Abstract

Dhaka, the capital of Bangladesh, is facing severe traffic congestion. Owing to the flaws in past land use and transport planning decisions, uncontrolled population growth and urbanization, Dhaka’s traffic condition is worsening. Road space is widely regarded in the literature as a utility, so a common view of transport economists is that its usage ought to be charged.

Road pricing policy has proven to be effective in managing travel demand, in order to reduce traffic congestion from road networks in a number of cities including London, Stockholm and Singapore. Road pricing as an economic mechanism to manage travel demand can be more effective and user-friendly when revenue is hypothecated into supply alternatives such as improvements to the transit system. This research investigates the feasibility of adopting road pricing in Dhaka with respect to a significant Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project. Because both are very new concepts for the population of Dhaka, public acceptability would be a principal issue driving their success or failure.

This paper explores the travel behaviour of workers in Dhaka and public perception toward Road Pricing with regards to work trips- based on worker’s travel behaviour. A revealed preference and stated preference survey has been conducted on sample of workers in Dhaka. They were asked limited demographic questions, their current travel behaviour and at the end they had been given several hypothetical choices of integrated BRT and road pricing to choose from. Key finding from the survey is the objective of integrated road pricing; subsidies Bus rapid Transit by road pricing to get reduced BRT fare; cannot be achieved in Dhaka. This is because most of the respondent stated that they would choose the cheapest option Walk-BRT-Walk, even though this would be more time consuming and uncomfortable as they have to walk from home to BRT station and also from BRT station to home. Proper economic analysis has to be carried out to find out the appropriate fare of BRT and road charge with some incentive for the low income people.

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ID Code: 53699
Item Type: Conference Paper
Keywords: road pricing, bus rapid transit, travel demand management, transport surveys, transport planning, Dhaka
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > ENGINEERING (090000) > CIVIL ENGINEERING (090500) > Transport Engineering (090507)
Divisions: Current > Schools > School of Civil Engineering & Built Environment
Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Science & Engineering Faculty
Current > Research Centres > Smart Transport Research Centre
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 ARRB Group Ltd and Authors
Copyright Statement: © ARRB Group Ltd and Authors 2012
Deposited On: 19 Sep 2012 12:59
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2013 06:51

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