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History behind the IVF egg: Are women's comprehensive histories associated with the number of eggs collected, or fertilised normally, from repeated IVF cycles? [abstract]

Herbert, Danielle L., Lucke, Jayne C , & Dobson, Annette J (2011) History behind the IVF egg: Are women's comprehensive histories associated with the number of eggs collected, or fertilised normally, from repeated IVF cycles? [abstract]. American Journal of Epidemiology, 173(Suppl ), S18.

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Abstract

Most studies of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) outcomes use cycle-based data and fail to account for women who use repeated IVF cycles. The objective of this study was to examine the association between the number of eggs collected (EC) and the percentage fertilised normally, and women’s self-reported medical, personal and social histories. This study involved a crosssectional survey of infertile women (aged 27-46 years) recruited from four privately-owned fertility clinics located in major cities of Australia. Regression modeling was used to estimate the mean EC and mean percentage of eggs fertilised normally: adjusted for age at EC. Appropriate statistical methods were used to take account of repeated IVF cycles by the same women. Among 121 participants who returned the survey and completed 286 IVF cycles, the mean age at EC was 35.2 years (SD 4.5). Women’s age at EC was strongly associated with the number of EC: <30 years, 11.7 EC; 30.0-< 35 years, 10.6 EC; 35.0-<40.0 years, 7.3 EC; 40.0+ years, 8.1 EC; p<.0001. Prolonged use of oral contraceptives was associated with lower numbers of EC: never used, 14.6 EC; 0-2 years, 11.7 EC; 3-5 years, 8.5 EC; 6þ years, 8.2 EC; p=.04. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) was associated with more EC: have PCOS, 11.5 EC; no, 8.3 EC; p=.01. Occupational exposures may be detrimental to normal fertilisation: professional roles, 58.8%; trade and service roles, 51.8%; manual and other roles, 63.3%; p=.02. In conclusion, women’s age remains the most significant characteristic associated with EC but not the percentage of eggs fertilised normally.

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ID Code: 54137
Item Type: Journal Article
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwr181
ISSN: 1476-6256
Divisions: Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Oxford University Press
Deposited On: 06 Nov 2012 09:10
Last Modified: 10 Dec 2012 11:43

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