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Aging and its effect on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury

Peake, Jonathan, Della Gatta, Paul, & Cameron-Smith, David (2010) Aging and its effect on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury. American Journal of Physiology – Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 298, R1485-R1495.

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Abstract

Aging and its effects on inflammation in skeletal muscle at rest and following exercise-induced muscle injury. Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol 298: R1485-R1495, 2010. First published April 14, 2010; doi:10.1152/ajpregu.00467.2009.-The world's elderly population is expanding rapidly, and we are now faced with the significant challenge of maintaining or improving physical activity, independence, and quality of life in the elderly. Counteracting the progressive loss of muscle mass that occurs in the elderly, known as sarcopenia, represents a major hurdle in achieving these goals. Indirect evidence for a role of inflammation in sarcopenia is that markers of systemic inflammation correlate with the loss of muscle mass and strength in the elderly. More direct evidence is that compared with skeletal muscle of young people, the number of macrophages is lower, the gene expression of several cytokines is higher, and stress signaling proteins are activated in skeletal muscle of elderly people at rest. Sarcopenia may also result from inadequate repair and chronic maladaptation following muscle injury in the elderly. Macrophage infiltration and the gene expression of certain cytokines are reduced in skeletal muscle of elderly people compared with young people following exercise-induced muscle injury. Further research is required to identify the cause(s) of inflammation in skeletal muscle of elderly people. Additional work is also needed to expand our understanding of the cells, proteins, and transcription factors that regulate inflammation in the skeletal muscle of elderly people at rest and after exercise. This knowledge is critical for devising strategies to restrict sarcopenia, and improve the health of today's elderly population.

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ID Code: 54297
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: aging, exercise, muscle injury, inflammation, regeneration
DOI: 10.1152/ajpregu.00467.2009
ISSN: 0363-6119
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > CLINICAL SCIENCES (110300) > Geriatrics and Gerontology (110308)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Exercise Physiology (110602)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Deposited On: 25 Oct 2012 13:11
Last Modified: 26 Oct 2012 11:30

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