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Exercise for health : a randomized, controlled trial evaluating impact of a pragmatic, translational exercise intervention on quality of life, function and treatment-related side effects following breast cancer

Hayes, Sandi, Rye, Sheree, DiSipio, Tracey, Yates, Patsy, Bashford, John, Pyke, Chris, Saunders, Christobel, Battistutta, Diana, & Eakin, Elizabeth (2013) Exercise for health : a randomized, controlled trial evaluating impact of a pragmatic, translational exercise intervention on quality of life, function and treatment-related side effects following breast cancer. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 137(1), pp. 175-186.

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Abstract

Purpose

Exercise for Health was a randomized, controlled trial designed to evaluate two modes of delivering (face-to-face [FtF] and over-the-telephone [Tel]) an 8-month translational exercise intervention, commencing 6-weeks post-breast cancer surgery (PS).

Methods

Outcomes included quality of life (QoL), function (fitness and upper-body) and treatment-related side effects (fatigue, lymphoedema, body mass index, menopausal symptoms, anxiety, depression and pain). Generalised estimating equation modelling determined time (baseline [5-weeks PS], mid-intervention [6-months PS], post-intervention [12-months PS]), group (FtF, Tel, Usual Care [UC]) and time-by-group effects. 194 women representative of the breast cancer population were randomised to the FtF (n=67), Tel (n=67) and UC (n=60) groups. Results: There were significant (p<0.05) interaction effects on QoL, fitness and fatigue, with differences being observed between the treatment groups and the UC group. Trends observed for the treatment groups were similar. The treatment groups reported improved QoL, fitness and fatigue over time and changes observed between baseline and post-intervention were clinically relevant. In contrast, the UC group experienced no change, or worsening QoL, fitness and fatigue, mid-intervention. Although improvements in the UC group occurred by 12-months post-surgery, the change did not meet the clinically relevant threshold. There were no differences in other treatment-related side-effects between groups.

Conclusion

This translational intervention trial, delivered either face-to-face or over-the-telephone, supports exercise as a form of adjuvant breast cancer therapy that can prevent declines in fitness and function during treatment and optimise recovery post-treatment.

Impact and interest:

4 citations in Scopus
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3 citations in Web of Science®

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ID Code: 54613
Item Type: Journal Article
Keywords: breast cancer, randomized controlled trial, exercise, quality of life, function
DOI: 10.1007/s10549-012-2331-y
ISSN: 1573-7217
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > HUMAN MOVEMENT AND SPORTS SCIENCE (110600) > Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified (110699)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > ONCOLOGY AND CARCINOGENESIS (111200) > Oncology and Carcinogenesis not elsewhere classified (111299)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES (111700) > Epidemiology (111706)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Nursing
Current > Schools > School of Public Health & Social Work
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2012 Springer
Copyright Statement: The original publication is available at SpringerLink http://www.springerlink.com
Deposited On: 07 Nov 2012 10:30
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2014 04:56

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