Prevalence of malnutrition in community-dwelling adults with Parkinson's disease

Sheard, Jamie M, Ash, Susan, Silburn, Peter A., & Kerr, Graham K. (2012) Prevalence of malnutrition in community-dwelling adults with Parkinson's disease. Nutrition & Dietetics, 69(s1), p. 100.

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Abstract

People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have been reported to be at higher risk of malnutrition than an age-matched population due to PD motor and non-motor symptoms and pharmacotherapy side effects. The prevalence of malnutrition in PD has yet to be well-defined. Community-dwelling people with PD, aged > 18 years, were recruited (n = 97, 61 M, 36 F). The Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PGSGA) was used to assess nutritional status, the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire (PDQ-39) was used to assess quality of life, and the Beck’s Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to measure depression. Levodopa equivalent doses (LEDs) were calculated based on reported Parkinson’s disease medication. Weight, height, mid-arm circumference (MAC) and calf circumference were measured. Cognitive function was measured using the Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination. Average age was 70.0 (9.1, 35–92) years. Based on SGA, 16 (16.5%) were moderately malnourished (SGA B) while none were severely malnourished (SGA C). The well-nourished participants (SGA A) had a better quality of life, t(90) = −2.28, p < 0.05, and reported less depressive symptoms, t(94)= −2.68, p < 0.05 than malnourished participants. Age, years since diagnosis, cognitive function and LEDs did not signifi cantly differ between the groups. The well-nourished participants had lower PG-SGA scores, t(95) = −5.66, p = 0.00, higher BMIs, t(95) = 3.44, p < 0.05, larger MACs, t(95) = 3.54, p < 0.05 and larger calf circumferences, t(95) = 2.29, p < 0.05 than malnourished participants. Prevalence of malnutrition in community-dwelling adults with PD in this study is comparable to that in other studies with community-dwelling adults without PD and is higher than other PD studies where a nutritional status assessment tool was used. Further research is required to understand the primary risk factors for malnutrition in this group.

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ID Code: 55443
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
DOI: 10.1111/j.1747-0080.2012.01611.x
ISSN: 1446-6368
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NEUROSCIENCES (110900) > Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases (110904)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Clinical and Sports Nutrition (111101)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000) > NUTRITION AND DIETETICS (111100) > Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified (111199)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Exercise & Nutrition Sciences
Deposited On: 10 Dec 2012 23:50
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2013 15:21

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