Does the addition of integrated cognitive behaviour therapy and motivational interviewing improve the outcomes of standard care for young people with comorbid depression and substance misuse?

Hides, Leanne, Elkins, Kathryn, Scaffidi, Antonietta, Cotton, Sue, Carroll, Steve, , & (2011) Does the addition of integrated cognitive behaviour therapy and motivational interviewing improve the outcomes of standard care for young people with comorbid depression and substance misuse? Medical Journal of Australia, 195(3), S31-S37.

View at publisher

Abstract

Background: The high rates of comorbid depression and substance use in young people have been associated with a range of adverse outcomes. Yet, few treatment studies have been conducted with this population. Objective: To determine if the addition of Motivational Interviewing and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (MI/CBT) to standard alcohol and other drug (AOD) care improves the outcomes of young people with comorbid depression and substance use. Participants and Setting: Participants comprised 88 young people with comorbid depression (Kessler 10 score of > 17) and substance use (mainly alcohol/cannabis) seeking treatment at two youth AOD services in Melbourne, Australia. Sixty young people received MI/CBT in addition to standard care (SC) and 28 received SC alone. Outcomes Measures: Primary outcome measures were depressive symptoms and drug and alcohol use in the past month. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3 and 6 months follow up. Results and Conclusions: The addition of MI/CBT to SC was associated with a significantly greater rate of change in depression, cannabis use, motivation to change substance use and social contact in the first 3 months. However, those who received SC had achieved similar improvements on these variables by 6 months follow up. All young people achieved significant improvements in functioning and quality of life variables over time, regardless of the treatment group. No changes in alcohol or other drug use were found in either group. The delivery of MI/CBT in addition to standard AOD care may offer accelerated treatment gains in the short-term.

Impact and interest:

15 citations in Scopus
Search Google Scholar™
12 citations in Web of Science®

Citation counts are sourced monthly from Scopus and Web of Science® citation databases.

These databases contain citations from different subsets of available publications and different time periods and thus the citation count from each is usually different. Some works are not in either database and no count is displayed. Scopus includes citations from articles published in 1996 onwards, and Web of Science® generally from 1980 onwards.

Citations counts from the Google Scholar™ indexing service can be viewed at the linked Google Scholar™ search.

Full-text downloads:

265 since deposited on 08 Jan 2013
42 in the past twelve months

Full-text downloads displays the total number of times this work’s files (e.g., a PDF) have been downloaded from QUT ePrints as well as the number of downloads in the previous 365 days. The count includes downloads for all files if a work has more than one.

ID Code: 56148
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: depression, cannabis, alcohol, young people, treatment, motivational interviewing, cognitive behaviour therapy
ISSN: 0025-729X
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Copyright Owner: Copyright 2011 Australasian Medical Publishing Company
Deposited On: 08 Jan 2013 02:45
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2015 01:03

Export: EndNote | Dublin Core | BibTeX

Repository Staff Only: item control page