Elaborated intrusion theory : a cognitive-emotional theory of food craving

May, Jon, Andrade, Jackie, Kavanagh, David J., & Hetherington, Marion (2012) Elaborated intrusion theory : a cognitive-emotional theory of food craving. Current Obesity Reports, 1(2), pp. 114-121.

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Abstract

A clear understanding of the cognitive-emotional processes underpinning desires to overconsume foods and adopt sedentary lifestyles can inform the development of more effective interventions to promote healthy eating and physical activity. The Elaborated Intrusion Theory of Desires offers a framework that can help in this endeavor through its emphases on the roles of intrusive thoughts and elaboration of multisensory imagery. There is now substantial evidence that tasks that compete for limited working memory resources with food-related imagery can reduce desires to eat that food, and that positive imagery can promote functional behavior. Meditation mindfulness can also short-circuit elaboration of dysfunctional cognition. Functional Decision Making is an approach that applies laboratory-based research on desire, to provide a motivational intervention to establish and entrench behavior changes, so healthy eating and physical activity become everyday habits.

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ID Code: 56766
Item Type: Journal Article
Refereed: Yes
Keywords: Food cravings, Elaborated intrusion, Appetite, Sensory imagery, Affect regulation, Acceptance-based interventions, Functional decision making, Behavior change
DOI: 10.1007/s13679-012-0010-2
ISSN: 2162-4968
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100)
Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES (170000) > PSYCHOLOGY (170100) > Health Clinical and Counselling Psychology (170106)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Current > Schools > School of Psychology & Counselling
Deposited On: 01 Feb 2013 01:39
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2013 15:29

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