Reproductive health : findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Chapter 3: Use of contraception

Lucke, Jayne C., Watson, Melanie, & Herbert, Danielle L. (2009) Reproductive health : findings from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Chapter 3: Use of contraception. The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD.

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Abstract

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Chapter 3: Use of contraception. p15-32

Key findings: This section examines trends in the use of contraception between 1996 and 2006 by women who participated in the surveys for the 1973-1978 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

  1. The oral contraceptive pill was the most commonly used method of contraception at each survey, but its use decreased over time.

2.Of women who consistently used contraception, 40% used the oral contraceptive pill as their only method of contraception in at least three out of four surveys.

  1. The proportion of women using condoms as their only method of contraception remained steady over time (15-18%) but only 3% of all women used condoms only at every survey.

  2. The proportion of women using both condoms and the oral contraceptive pill remained steady at 13-14% of all women from Survey 1 to 3, but decreased to 8% of all women at Survey 4.

  3. The use of methods other than the oral contraceptive pill and/or condoms increased at Survey 4.

  4. The proportion of women using an implant (e.g. Implanon) remained steady between Surveys 3 and 4, with 3% of women using an implant only. Around one third of implant users at Survey 3 continued to use this method at Survey 4.

  5. The main reasons for not using contraception at Surveys 3 and 4 were pregnancy, trying to conceive, or no male sexual partners.

  6. Women who used contraception were more likely to be in de facto relationships or single, be up to date with Pap tests and have had two or more births.

  7. Women who did not use contraception were more likely to be non-drinkers and/or do low levels of exercise, have had one birth and have experienced miscarriage.

  8. Contraception changed in expected ways according to reproductive events: women who reported only miscarriages between surveys also stopped using contraception in the same period; most women who did not report reproductive events continued to use the same method of contraception; and women who had a termination tended to switch methods.

Impact and interest:

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ID Code: 56882
Item Type: Report
Refereed: No
Additional Information: Final report prepared for the Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing
Keywords: Contraception, Pregnancy
Subjects: Australian and New Zealand Standard Research Classification > MEDICAL AND HEALTH SCIENCES (110000)
Divisions: Current > QUT Faculties and Divisions > Faculty of Health
Current > Institutes > Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation
Deposited On: 05 Feb 2013 23:52
Last Modified: 18 May 2017 05:07

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